Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Monstermob Group LSE:MOB London Ordinary Share GB0033768507 ORD 2.5P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.00p +0.00% 25.50p 0.00p 0.00p - - - 0 05:00:10
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
- - - - 32.98

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Date Time Title Posts
01/7/201407:41Monstermob - the new Patientline5
01/7/201407:40MOB, the stock for 20052,911
13/1/201217:22Mobile phone trading...9
23/12/201008:15Legal action against Monstermob5
10/10/200809:44Monstermob (MOB) - Exceptional Growth Continues in 20063,998

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DateSubject
27/9/2016
09:20
Monstermob Daily Update: Monstermob Group is listed in the sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker MOB. The last closing price for Monstermob was 25.50p.
Monstermob Group has a 4 week average price of - and a 12 week average price of -.
The 1 year high share price is - while the 1 year low share price is currently -.
There are currently 129,330,097 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 0 shares. The market capitalisation of Monstermob Group is £32,979,174.74.
04/1/2007
18:09
frome: I fail to see how ZED can now reverse into MOB without making it very worthwhile for MOB shareholders. If the MOB share price fell after the deal, it would be almost prima facia evidence of foul play on the part of the directors. Advisers (e.g valuers of ZED) would also tread very carefully, as they too owe a duty of care to the company generally, not just the majority shareholder. Some on this bb I think are confusing the actions of bondholders wiping out shareholder value following debt default, which we have seen many times, and forced rights issues at a deep discount. If ZED want full control, it will have to be by way of an acquisition of stock not held.
04/1/2007
10:39
frome: Proof of the pudding would be the effect on MOB share price. MOB holders only stuffed if share price falls - ergo lawsuits. Non arms length transactions always come under scrutiny. We don't live in a banana republic.
14/9/2006
18:06
scorpionwinger: Funky, Below summarises the extracts from the AGM statement What it says in summary is: Loan notes/cash due to vendors: ATOP$25m Russia $5m W Infinity $17m M Dream $24m Total $71m Shares due to be issued Russia/Philippines $35m at current market price (28m shares) W Infinity 6.5m shares (at £3) M Dream 4.3m shares (at £3) Total number of shares post dilution 61m + 28+6.5+4.3 =99.8 i.e. Current shareholders will only own 61%. This assumes that $71m of debt obligations repayable over 2 years doesn't sink the company first (bit of a problem if UK and China are not making any profit). If of course the share price after a bid collapses drops to lets say 30p, the shares issued for the $35m obligation increases to 61m, current shareholders will only own 48%. If the shares collapse to 10p, current owners will only own 24% Hope the analysis helps......... For clarification, and as previously announced, the following are the total amounts due to vendors of the businesses we have acquired, other than W-Infinity and M-Dream: * Based on our current expectations of financial performance, approximately $20m in 2007 to the vendors of Upper Mobile (Philippines) and approximately $15m in 2008 to the vendors of Mobikon (Russia). These amounts can be settled in shares, at a price based on the prevailing market price prior to issue (or cash at the option of Monstermob). * An obligation to redeem loan notes to the vendors of ATOP (China) in cash to the value of $25m during 2006 and 2007. * An obligation to redeem loan notes to the vendors of Mobikon in cash up to the value of $5m during 2007. W Infinity * Tranche 2 payments are due following the completion of the audited 2005 results of W-Infinity and will be equal to 7 times 2005 EBITDA. This will be satisfied as to $2m in cash with the balance (which we currently expect to be approximately $11.5m) in shares (or cash at the option of Monstermob) at a price of 300p per share. In addition, Monstermob has agreed to issue additional new shares to the vendors to average the price at which they received shares under Tranche 1 to 300p. In total, therefore, we expect that approximately 2.7 million shares will be issued under Tranche 2. * Tranche 3 payments are due shortly after completion of the audit for the year ended 31 December 2006 and will be three times 2006 EBITDA, conditional on the EBITDA not being less than $12m. This will be satisfied through the issue of a $15m loan note, bearing interest at the rate of 5% per annum, to be amortised predominantly during 2007 and 2008. It is anticipated that the cash generated within the W-Infinity business itself will be sufficient to satisfy the amortisation. The balance will be in the form of new Monstermob shares (or cash at the option of Monstermob) at a price of 300p per share. Based on our current expectation of total consideration, approximately 3.8 million shares would be issued under Tranche 3. MDream * The "Second Payment" of $4m is due if (as is expected) the unaudited EBITDA for 9 months ending 30 June 2006 is not less than $2m. It is expected that this will be payable in July 2006. This will be satisfied through $2m in new Monstermob shares (or cash at the option of Monstermob) at a price of 300p per share, and $2m in the form of a loan note bearing interest at the rate of 5% per annum, due in December 2006. In addition, Monstermob has agreed to issue additional new shares to the vendors to average the price at which they received shares under the "Initial Payment" to 300p. In total, therefore, approximately 0.8m shares will be issued under the "Second Payment". * The "Earn Out Payment" is calculated as 10.5 times the audited EBITDA for the 12 months ending 30 September 2006, less amounts paid under the Initial and Second Payments. This is to be satisfied through 50% in new Monstermob shares (or cash at the option of Monstermob) at a price of 300p per share and 50% in the form of a loan note, bearing interest at the rate of 5% per annum, to be amortised predominantly during 2007 and 2008. Based on our current expectation of total consideration, the face value of the loan note will be $15.5m to $20.5m and 2.8m to 3.7m new shares will be issued.
10/8/2006
12:05
alwaysbanking: Monstermob rings up gain on bid approach By Nic Fildes Published: 09 August 2006 Shares in Monstermob surged 25 per cent yesterday after the mobile phone content developer said it had been approached about a takeover. Although it did not reveal the identity of the interested party, analysts said an opportunistic industry player could be behind the move. Monstermob said the approach was indicative while talks were at a preliminary stage and subject to "material preconditions". Nevertheless, the news came as welcome relief to investors with shares adding a quarter in value to close at 70p. Monstermob shares had collapsed to about 40p from a peak of 462.5p in September after a series of profits warnings. In June, it axed founder and chief executive Martin Higginson but worse came in July when changes to regulation in China related to mobile phone content wiped 50 per cent off its share price. With the stock trading at only two times consensus forecasts for the year, one analyst described the shares as "ridiculously cheap", a view shared by Monstermob's management. Yet the company has struggled to regain credibility with institutional investors over customer service issues in the UK and regulatory worries in China, leading to speculation that a management buyout could be on the horizon. Monstermob shares soared 35 per cent on Monday on rumours of a bid. Yet the approach was not led by Mr Higginson, still the company's largest shareholder, nor the chief executive Niccolo de Masi, leading to speculation that a private-equity company or an industry rival is looking to buy the company while its valuation is depressed. Monstermob, a profitable and cash generative business, has a strong presence in Europe and emerging markets, notably in Asia. VeriSign, the US company that develops the Crazy Frog, has been mentioned as a potential bidder but declined to comment. Another mobile content company analysts have highlighted is Spain's LaNetro Zed. It also declined to comment. Shares in Monstermob surged 25 per cent yesterday after the mobile phone content developer said it had been approached about a takeover. Although it did not reveal the identity of the interested party, analysts said an opportunistic industry player could be behind the move. Monstermob said the approach was indicative while talks were at a preliminary stage and subject to "material preconditions". Nevertheless, the news came as welcome relief to investors with shares adding a quarter in value to close at 70p. Monstermob shares had collapsed to about 40p from a peak of 462.5p in September after a series of profits warnings. In June, it axed founder and chief executive Martin Higginson but worse came in July when changes to regulation in China related to mobile phone content wiped 50 per cent off its share price. With the stock trading at only two times consensus forecasts for the year, one analyst described the shares as "ridiculously cheap", a view shared by Monstermob's management. Yet the company has struggled to regain credibility with institutional investors over customer service issues in the UK and regulatory worries in China, leading to speculation that a management buyout could be on the horizon. Monstermob shares soared 35 per cent on Monday on rumours of a bid. Yet the approach was not led by Mr Higginson, still the company's largest shareholder, nor the chief executive Niccolo de Masi, leading to speculation that a private-equity company or an industry rival is looking to buy the company while its valuation is depressed. Monstermob, a profitable and cash generative business, has a strong presence in Europe and emerging markets, notably in Asia. VeriSign, the US company that develops the Crazy Frog, has been mentioned as a potential bidder but declined to comment. Another mobile content company analysts have highlighted is Spain's LaNetro Zed. It also declined to comment.
26/7/2006
13:08
lqs: Ive started to go long on this. The reason being the recent acquisitions have been largely funded by MOB shares valued at 300p. 300p is 7 times the current MOB share price!! http://www.investegate.co.uk/Article.aspx?id=200606220700519897E
11/7/2006
08:37
williemanjaro: Independent- The Crazy Frog croaks - leaving Monstermob to face its demons The chairman Hans Snook's emphasis on China has come back to haunt him By Nic Fildes Published: 11 July 2006 When the irritating Crazy Frog topped the pop charts last year, it appeared that mobile content had come of age. Going back to 2000, when mobile telecoms operators splashed out £22bn on licences to build and operate third-generation networks, the mobile industry has assumed that voracious demand for content such as music, ringtones, video downloads and mobile games would justify such massive investment. The Crazy Frog's rapid rise to international pop stardom showed that mobile content could generate substantial returns and even cross over from the small mobile screen to the television screen and beyond. It was amidst this enthusiasm that Monstermob, a mobile ringtone and wallpaper specialist, came to market in 2003. Following the path of Jamdat and iTouch, rival mobile content companies that attracted top-price takeovers by larger media players, Monstermob's share price took off, reaching a peak of 462.5p last September. At that stage, Monstermob's founder and chief executive, Martin Higginson, dubbed Lord of the Ringtones, could do no wrong. The Barclay brothers, owners of the Telegraph newspaper group, took a 3 per cent stake in the mobile content company, and just like chairman Hans Snook's previous company, Orange, Monstermob's future looked bright. Yet 2006 has proved a desperate year for the Lancashire company. It has suffered an alarming 87 per cent decline in its market value over the past year, and in June, Mr Higginson was sacked after disagreements over strategy. Mr Higginson was committed to investing heavily in fancy new services for the UK market to revive its fortunes in the region. Mr Snook and the Monstermob board decided that Mr Higginson's strategy was not appropriate given the company had invested heavily outside the UK and thus derived the majority of revenue from high-growth regions like China. The former JP Morgan banker Niccolo de Masi was appointed as chief executive. Yet only a few weeks later, Mr Snook's emphasis on China has come back to haunt him. China Mobile, the world's largest mobile phone company by subscriber and China's dominant mobile phone operator, has changed its policy on mobile content subscription in response to regulatory concerns. Regulators in China have clamped down on a common industry practice of signing up customers to monthly contracts when the user only agreed to buy a single product. The move, which echoes regulatory action in the UK, will affect Monstermob and a host of other Chinese mobile phone content players listed in the UK and US. IGM, which raised nearly £10m through a listing on London's Alternative Investment Market in May at 51p, is a Chinese mobile content specialist that derives 100 per cent of its revenue from the region. IGM's shares have collapsed to 16p after China Mobile's move. Nasdaq-listed Chinese content specialists such as Sina, Tom Online, KongZhong Corp and Linktone will also feel the heat as a result of China Mobile's crackdown. After Mr Higginson's departure, Mr Snook talked of pushing the share price back above 300p, "where it belongs". Yet after the Chinese policy change, Monstermob's shares crashed a further 59 per cent to 56p. IGM, despite its smaller size and total reliance on the Chinese market, fell a more modest 28 per cent, to 15.5p. Monstermob's broker, Investec, has now reduced its rating to "hold" from "buy". It said that between 20 per cent and 30 per cent of projected operating profit could be at risk. China Mobile's new content policy looks like common sense. The operator will increase the free trial period for mobile content to one month from one week, and will send monthly text messages to users asking them whether they want to maintain their subscription. Andrew Darley, a KBC Peel Hunt analyst, said: "The basis of these subscriptions appears to be that the customer either forgets about the subscription or does not even know they have been registered. All China Mobile is doing is reminding people they can easily cancel these subscriptions." In the UK, Monstermob's home market, the telecoms regulator, Ofcom, acted after consumers, many of them children attracted to cartoon characters and pop ringtones, did not realise they had signed up to relatively expensive monthly subscription payments for content they did not want. Jamdat's Crazy Frog, the mobile content golden goose, proved the worst offender, but all mobile operators were affected. Understandably, the scandal left a bad taste in the public's mouth. Anecdotally, mobile content companies offering one-time downloads of content found that many users would text "stop" after each purchase even though it was not necessary to do so. Many ceased purchasing content for mobile phones altogether, while others steered clear of independent content producers such as Monstermob and Jamdat. Instead, consumers started using mobile phone company portals for mobile content, as well as other "trusted" brands like The Sun. The move by the Chinese authorities suggests that similar problems have occurred in the Far East. Monstermob, which has bought a number of Chinese content developers over the past year, expects a significant short-term impact. About 50 per cent of its current net revenue has been derived from China, and about 40 per cent of that revenue is subscription-based. The company said that the regulatory intervention is likely to impair its ability to acquire and retain new subscribers, and it will take steps to migrate revenue to single-purchase sales. Other Chinese operators, such as China Netcom, China Unicom and China Telecom, could also tighten content subscription guidelines. "It's a very bleak market to be operating in," Mr Darley said. Mr de Masi said that although third-quarter results will suffer from the regulatory move, he expects Monstermob's revenue to start recovering in the fourth quarter. When the company reports results in September, it will provide more clarity about the specific impact of the Chinese situation. Mr de Masi said that after some short-term pain as the market is restructured, Monstermob still expects to be a "top-four player" in Chinese mobile content. He said he expects to gain market share once smaller players have been weeded out. If Monstermob does remain a key partner of China Mobile's over the coming years, it could recover some lost ground. Neighbouring Japan and South Korea have some of the highest mobile phone revenue per user rates in the world, driven by huge amounts of content and not just the Crazy Frog. Improving the Chinese market in the long-term could produce similar spending splurges as more Chinese people get hold of mobile phones. But until the promise of legitimate mobile content has been proven to generate sustainable recurring revenue in a number of regions, Monstermob's message might be lost amidst a cacophony of bleeping "stop" text messages.
10/7/2006
10:40
vs: MOB share price since Fuse opened this thread : 22/06/2006 MOB 188 23/06/2006 MOB 179 26/06/2006 MOB 167 27/06/2006 MOB 171.25 28/06/2006 MOB 167.5 29/06/2006 MOB 149 30/06/2006 MOB 140 03/07/2006 MOB 138.75 04/07/2006 MOB 130 05/07/2006 MOB 144 06/07/2006 MOB 145 07/07/2006 MOB 136.5 today ... oops! (What rebound I hear you ask!)
30/6/2006
09:26
restassured: Of course all of the events didnt stop the greed.Even though the share price had crashed by over 50% leaving many shareholders with massive losses,even though just a few weeks later the co announced its second profits warning of the year,what did the directors go and do??? They awarded themselves further massive share option packages..the greed only gets worse.............. Salaries for the MD jumped from £79,000 to over £170,000 even though the UK had collapsed!!! RNS Number:9496B MonsterMob Group PLC 25 April 2006 Date: 25 April 2006 On behalf of: Monstermob Group PLC ("Monstermob" or the "Company") MONSTERMOB GROUP PLC MonsterMob Group PLC Director/PDMR Shareholding Grant of options The following grant of options over new ordinary shares in Monstermob Group plc was made on 24 April 2006, at nil cost, under the Monstermob Group plc Unapproved Share Option Scheme, to acquire the following number of ordinary shares of 2.5 pence in the Company at an exercise price of 288 pence per share: Martin Higginson options over 250,000 shares Rico Gonzales options over 250,000 shares Yongqiang Qian options over 250,000 shares Niccolo de Masi options over 500,000 shares David Marks options over 500,000 shares Brian Casazza options over 500,000 shares The options will vest on 24 April 2009 and will be exercisable from that date until 23 April 2016 if the price of an ordinary share in the Company on any day during the period of 60 dealings days commencing on the first dealing day falling on or after 23 April 2008 exceeds the following target share prices: Target Share Prices In respect of 25% of the award 350 pence In respect of 25% of the award 400 pence In respect of 25% of the award 425 pence In respect of 25% of the award 450 pence In addition, on 23 April 2006 Brian Casazza, Director, was granted, at nil cost, options, under the Monstermob Group plc Unapproved Share Option Scheme, to acquire up to 500,000 ordinary shares of 2.5 pence in the Company at an exercise price of 288 pence per share. The options are exercisable in the period commencing on 24 April 2009 and ending on 23 April 2016. 250,000 of these options are contingent upon the achievement of agreed business objectives concerning the performance of Monstermob's recently launched US Consumer Services activity. The remaining options will be exercisable if the price of an ordinary share in the Company on any day during the period of 60 dealings days commencing on the first dealing day falling on or after 21 April 2008 exceeds the following target share prices: No. of shares that can be acquired Target Share Prices 100,000 No target 50,000 350 pence 50,000 400 pence 50,000 450 pence The total number of shares over which each person now holds options is as follows: Martin Higginson options over 285,000 shares Rico Gonzales options over 250,000 shares Yongqiang Qian options over 250,000 shares Niccolo de Masi options over 1,900,000 shares David Marks options over 1,000,000 shares Brian Casazza options over 1,000,000 shares This notification relates to both a transaction notified in accordance with DR 3.1.4R(1)(a); and DR 3.1.4R(1)(b). For further information, please contact: Emma Kane/Miranda Good Redleaf Communications Tel: 020 7955 1410
14/6/2006
09:21
williemanjaro: Independent-Ringtones pioneer Monstermob ousts founder By Nic Fildes Published: 14 June 2006 Martin Higginson, the founder and chief executive of the mobile phone content company Monstermob, has been axed after disagreements over strategy and a poor share price performance. Mr Higginson has paid the price for his close ties to the ailing UK operation. Niccolo de Masi, formerly of JP Morgan, will take over as chief executive with immediate effect. Mr de Masi has led the company's aggressive acquisition strategy into regions such as the US, China, Russia and the Philippines. It is those regions where Monstermob expects to derive the majority of its profit in future. Monstermob shares crashed 22 per cent to 153p following a warning that the UK business would only break even at the earnings level in the current year, a £1.5m reduction on previous guidance. Monstermob's share price has fallen 67 per cent from a peak of 462.5p in September. Ironically, Mr Higginson - dubbed "Lord of the Ring-tones" - defended the company's share price in the freesheet City AM yesterday morning. "It will sort itself out ... at the end of the day, I've only got one backside to kick. They've got to kick my backside if I don't deliver," he said. Mr Higginson holds a stake of about 12 per cent in the company. No pay-off has been agreed but according to the 2005 annual report, Mr Higginson was on a 12-month notice period and earned £160,000 last year. Hans Snook, the founder of the mobile phone company Orange and chairman of Monstermob, said the axing was "one the most difficult decisions I've ever made". He added that Mr Higginson was "very UK-centric which became problematic." Monstermob has invested heavily in new services in the UK that have not paid off. Monstermob will focus on improving profitability in the UK and rolling out services to emerging markets. Mr Snook said the renewed focus on profitability should help push the share price back over 300p. Monstermob sells about 26 million downloads a month, including mobile ringtones, video clips, games and gambling services. The business was founded by Mr Higginson in 2000 and floated in 2003. The stock attracted significant attention due to spectacular growth in the use of products such as ringtones and other downloadable content. The billionaire Barclay brothers own a 3 per cent stake in the company. Monstermob's prospects in the UK have deteriorated since flotation. The regulator, Ofcom, intervened in the market in 2005 after complaints that customers, often children, were unwittingly signing up to subscription services when trying to buy a single product, notably the "Crazy Frog" ringtone sold by one of Monstermob's rivals.
11/5/2006
10:19
saucepan: Don't complain too much. Remember you, too, can buy at current prices. I am confident the MOB share price will soon be going North.
Monstermob share price data is direct from the London Stock Exchange
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