Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Id Data LSE:IDD London Ordinary Share GB0009778589 ORD 1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.00p +0.00% 0.25p 0.00p 0.00p - - - 0.00 05:00:10
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Technology Hardware & Equipment - - - - 2.98

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Date Time Title Posts
12/10/201117:12ID Data Charts + News + Analysis8,918.00
14/10/200814:35IDD Too high too quick?13.00
11/4/200810:20ID Data to challenge the 25p mark again75.00
26/5/200712:00IDD progress47.00
25/5/200716:37Where is IDD Heading???22.00

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DateSubject
02/12/2008
17:10
powwow: Many companies on the aim market owe the Revenue tax for salaries. Its a matter of will they ever get it back and if IDD has never shown or attempted to make some payments, then they'll call it a day. The fact is , this companies share price has been going down and down. If you were the revenue would you take shares, no! So its cash only, and they have decided they are owed enough money. You'd think after all these years IDD would have cut costs, or increased revenue to a point the core business was viable. It wasn't to be, so one can assume their business model with the debt levels was unsustainable, so admin it is. It will not come back and the core assets will be taken private with no debts. There is simply no reason to do anything but that.
28/8/2008
06:55
lozzer1: It would be nice to see IDD turn from a sick patient to a healthy individual. If what you say is true SL, then peter Cox should really have no trouble from any lending body. But my question remains. Why is he looking for a private investor If the sales orders for current and future periods are that good that he can predict a return to profit he could sell that to the lending organistaions without the need to seek a private lender. Even in this current climate, lending bodies would lend if they saw the real potential of such a move and a solid return on their investment All we will see is a further dilution of any real value the share price may generate if IDD return to profit. Any positive move on the share price will be diluted by the billion or so shares
31/7/2008
10:52
bigpunt10: Some interesting posts and observations here today. Is nice to see the long term ever diluting tenacious holders having a say. I am sure you all know though that we have been at the mercy of hehe 'dark' forces at times. Am only gutted, as many probably are, that have not had an odd £100k to cash in on it. Hopefully, these should correct themselves to 1p without results etc the following , is a good, insightful read. Making sense of dramatic movements in volatile stock markets By James Clunie Last Updated: 6:24am BST 30/07/2008 Why is it that the prices of some UK shares move 10pc or more on days on which no company specific news is released? If, like me, you've been watching the stock market recently, this question has probably crossed your mind more than once. Our collective understanding of how shares should get priced in a "perfect" world struggles to explain such moves. Fortunately, help is at hand. In recent years, stock market researchers have identified a series of activities that can move share prices temporarily and dramatically away from fair value, possibly explaining some of the violent moves we have seen recently. Two of the more interesting phenomena are known as "predatory trading" and "crowded exits". Consider, first, "predatory trading" - a practice explained in lurid, theoretical detail in some recent academic papers. A "predator" learns about the trading position of some other market participant and begins to trade against him. If the predator is strong enough, he can move the market price of the stock away from fair value. This imposes losses on the other party, and as the losses build, the victim struggles to hold on to his stock position. Eventually, the victim capitulates and closes out his position at a loss, and at around the same time, the predator closes out his own position at a profit. The share price eventually recovers to its fair value. Who might fall victim to predatory trading? Victims could include anyone with a position that they might be unable to maintain as losses mount. This could include an investor in financial distress, a hedge fund unable to meet a margin call, or an open-ended fund having to sell shares to meet client redemptions. A more topical example is an underwriter left with an unhedged stock position after a rights issue. Other traders would quickly surmise that the underwriter held unwanted stock. If the share price were driven lower, the underwriter's losses would mount. For risk control reasons, the underwriter might be unable to hold on to the losing position and might sell low. Predators would cover their own positions by buying cheap stock from the distressed seller. Now, I do not know for sure that predatory trading was taking place in some UK bank shares recently, but the pattern of share prices and trading volumes that we saw in HBOS shares last week certainly matches the theoretical model. Another phenomenon that could explain some of the recent, violent share price moves is the concept of "crowded exits". We know that the hedge fund industry has grown rapidly in recent years, and that there has been a noticeable increase in short-selling, the practice that involves selling shares that are not owned and buying them back at some later date, hopefully at an advantageous price. Now, there is plenty of evidence that heavily shorted stocks perform, on average, badly and this suggests a simple trading strategy for short-sellers: namely, to identify heavily shorted stocks and build further short positions in those stocks. However, such acts of "imitation" change the market dynamics and can lead to unexpected consequences. In this case, imitation can lead short positions to become large relative to the number of shares that are normally traded each day in stock...the short position is then said to become "crowded". If a catalyst of some sort were to prompt short-sellers to change their minds rapidly and simultaneously, we would have short-sellers rushing to buy, but no new rush of people seeking to sell. This is known as a crowded exit. The idea is akin to the audience in a crowded theatre rushing to a narrow exit door once the fire alarm sounds?...?only so many can leave the building in any given interval of time. The effect would be temporary upward pressure on the share price. A variety of catalysts for a crowded exit are possible: a broker could change a recommendation on a stock, an investor could place a large buy order, or a rumour could cause a rapid change in sentiment. Recent patterns of share price moves and short-seller activity in companies as diverse as Punch Taverns, Bellway and Trinity Mirror have been consistent with the notion of a crowded exit. In fact, the shares of these three companies rose by an average of 43pc in just four days last week. A study into crowded exits* using UK stock lending data from Index Explorers shows that crowded exits are associated with significant losses for short-sellers who are unable to cover their positions rapidly. Traditional, long-only investors would generally be unable to exploit this finding by buying into crowded exits, as by definition these are illiquid positions. If short-sellers continue to grow in importance on the London Stock Exchange, it is likely that we will experience many more crowded exits. For an active stock market trader, it is vital to be aware of the risk of crowded exits, and to avoid at all costs the risk of becoming a victim of predatory trading. At the same time, astute traders who feel that they understand the reasons for extreme volatility can trade to benefit from temporary mis-pricings. If they are right and the share prices are eventually restored to fair value, they can earn excess profits. For the rest of us, and in particular for long-term, fundamental investors, the advice is much simpler. Crowded exits and predatory trading are technical events that have nothing to do with the fundamentals of a company. Fundamental investors should simply ignore the extreme volatility and stick to estimating companies' cash flows. James Clunie is Investment Trustee at The CBF Church of England Funds *Caveat Venditor - Crowded Exits! University of Edinburgh Centre for Financial Markets Research Working Paper. Clunie, Moles and Gao, 2008.
30/7/2008
14:44
newsman3: It is realistic. Why not? We have been at the mercy of higher forces. Sit, Charles. have patience. I know just a sec, read this. Making sense of dramatic movements in volatile stock markets By James Clunie Last Updated: 6:24am BST 30/07/2008 Why is it that the prices of some UK shares move 10pc or more on days on which no company specific news is released? If, like me, you've been watching the stock market recently, this question has probably crossed your mind more than once. Our collective understanding of how shares should get priced in a "perfect" world struggles to explain such moves. Fortunately, help is at hand. In recent years, stock market researchers have identified a series of activities that can move share prices temporarily and dramatically away from fair value, possibly explaining some of the violent moves we have seen recently. Two of the more interesting phenomena are known as "predatory trading" and "crowded exits". Consider, first, "predatory trading" - a practice explained in lurid, theoretical detail in some recent academic papers. A "predator" learns about the trading position of some other market participant and begins to trade against him. If the predator is strong enough, he can move the market price of the stock away from fair value. This imposes losses on the other party, and as the losses build, the victim struggles to hold on to his stock position. Eventually, the victim capitulates and closes out his position at a loss, and at around the same time, the predator closes out his own position at a profit. The share price eventually recovers to its fair value. Who might fall victim to predatory trading? Victims could include anyone with a position that they might be unable to maintain as losses mount. This could include an investor in financial distress, a hedge fund unable to meet a margin call, or an open-ended fund having to sell shares to meet client redemptions. A more topical example is an underwriter left with an unhedged stock position after a rights issue. Other traders would quickly surmise that the underwriter held unwanted stock. If the share price were driven lower, the underwriter's losses would mount. For risk control reasons, the underwriter might be unable to hold on to the losing position and might sell low. Predators would cover their own positions by buying cheap stock from the distressed seller. Now, I do not know for sure that predatory trading was taking place in some UK bank shares recently, but the pattern of share prices and trading volumes that we saw in HBOS shares last week certainly matches the theoretical model. Another phenomenon that could explain some of the recent, violent share price moves is the concept of "crowded exits". We know that the hedge fund industry has grown rapidly in recent years, and that there has been a noticeable increase in short-selling, the practice that involves selling shares that are not owned and buying them back at some later date, hopefully at an advantageous price. Now, there is plenty of evidence that heavily shorted stocks perform, on average, badly and this suggests a simple trading strategy for short-sellers: namely, to identify heavily shorted stocks and build further short positions in those stocks. However, such acts of "imitation" change the market dynamics and can lead to unexpected consequences. In this case, imitation can lead short positions to become large relative to the number of shares that are normally traded each day in stock...the short position is then said to become "crowded". If a catalyst of some sort were to prompt short-sellers to change their minds rapidly and simultaneously, we would have short-sellers rushing to buy, but no new rush of people seeking to sell. This is known as a crowded exit. The idea is akin to the audience in a crowded theatre rushing to a narrow exit door once the fire alarm sounds?...?only so many can leave the building in any given interval of time. The effect would be temporary upward pressure on the share price. A variety of catalysts for a crowded exit are possible: a broker could change a recommendation on a stock, an investor could place a large buy order, or a rumour could cause a rapid change in sentiment. Recent patterns of share price moves and short-seller activity in companies as diverse as Punch Taverns, Bellway and Trinity Mirror have been consistent with the notion of a crowded exit. In fact, the shares of these three companies rose by an average of 43pc in just four days last week. A study into crowded exits* using UK stock lending data from Index Explorers shows that crowded exits are associated with significant losses for short-sellers who are unable to cover their positions rapidly. Traditional, long-only investors would generally be unable to exploit this finding by buying into crowded exits, as by definition these are illiquid positions. If short-sellers continue to grow in importance on the London Stock Exchange, it is likely that we will experience many more crowded exits. For an active stock market trader, it is vital to be aware of the risk of crowded exits, and to avoid at all costs the risk of becoming a victim of predatory trading. At the same time, astute traders who feel that they understand the reasons for extreme volatility can trade to benefit from temporary mis-pricings. If they are right and the share prices are eventually restored to fair value, they can earn excess profits. For the rest of us, and in particular for long-term, fundamental investors, the advice is much simpler. Crowded exits and predatory trading are technical events that have nothing to do with the fundamentals of a company. Fundamental investors should simply ignore the extreme volatility and stick to estimating companies' cash flows. James Clunie is Investment Trustee at The CBF Church of England Funds
18/6/2008
07:28
lozzer1: CC, Tam As the market dictates the share price it's no good putting down what we would consider to be a fair share price. I'd like £1 Some of the technology that IDD has, along with the new manufacturing strategy should have moved the share price a bit, but the market says otherwise
18/6/2008
07:08
lozzer1: CC IF they reach the dizzy heights 4.25p, not when. There's far too many shares washing around the market that dilutes any current value. It would have to take a siesmic shift in the interest in IDD to shift the ceiling of the share price But then, I cannot see the market giving IDD any meaningful value when there is a billion plus shares floating around For example, say the shareprice goes to 25p (heaven forbid). I cannot see the market valuing IDD on the same level as the footsie 100 big players. For a start, assets of IDD do not warrant a share value of £1/4 billion
10/6/2008
06:35
snake516: I think we need to understand why the share price of IDD is not reacting to the contract news. Hoping for another contract award or hanging on for the results in the hope that there will be a rise in the share price is blind optimism in the face of the reality of a share languishing below 1/2p. All this drivel about overhang and sells v buys is exactly that; Bullsh*t. How can this company's share price be stuck in the doldrums when it is clearly full of potential and winning decent contracts? What is happening behind the scenes that is keeping the price depressed? Those of you who claim to be close to the company; what is going on?!?
03/1/2008
19:02
snake516: I forgot to ask you all for your prediction of what the IDD share price will be on 31 December 2008 - mine is 1.5p, assuming that the fundraising goes well and does not dilute the price any further, CredECard profits are large enough to impact on the overall ID Data Group bottom line (very small overall loss or tiny profit?) and the national ID card scheme is not awarded to anyone who is likely to involve IDD. However, if the fundraising goes well, the company makes its first profit and gets a sniff of involvement (however tiny) in the national ID card, then 9-10p by year end could be possible. DYOR and Good Luck to every IDD holder...
22/12/2006
17:56
lozzerg: All Spoke to a dealer at redmayne Bentley in Leeds. I told her that the behaviour of the IDD share price was very unusual and that it had passed the golden cross. She looked at the recent climb and rose her eyebrows. She then rung up an MM and asked why this was. The MM got back to say that there was a rumour of a contract. They didn't mention how big or for how long but given the recent demand for this share I would say that the MMs know about this and have been buying in droves (maybe on pure speculation!). I think that we will continue to see a strong buying trend until either news of the contract is released or the MMs get bored with their holdings and sell Merry christmas to all
20/10/2006
07:20
lobby3: Morning newsman, morning all P199ker Which company has the software. It could be that IDD goes into partnership with them. Fairdealer, as for goldsmith et al, if Goldsmith has an interset in this company then IDD cannot be part of the ID card bid as it would go against the fair competition rules of parliment. Goldsmith would have to declare the interest and then either divest himself of the shares for IDD to bid or IDD do not bid Newsman I would love to see the IDD share price start a pheonix type rebirth but two things stand in the way 1. Heavy dilution of some 1.2 billion shares 2. Market confidence I would love for you to say "I told you so" as IDD gets a very healthy share price and I would be the first to admit that I was a whinger and whiner and that we should have held the faith as you did as I have a very sizeable chunk of shares that I accumulated in better times, but somehow I don't think so
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