Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Galileo Inn. LSE:GAI London Ordinary Share GB0031286759 ORD 0.1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.00p - - - - - - - - -
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
- - - - 0.00

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Date Time Title Posts
30/4/200709:48FLURRY AT GALILIEO & REALLY AWFUL76
28/7/200618:41Galileo Innovation - Interview With Mark Warburton69
28/7/200617:38GAI GO BUST20
28/7/200616:14FURY AT GALILIEO261
12/8/200317:29FLURRY AT GALILEO & A REAL BARGAIN1,939

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DateSubject
26/9/2016
09:20
Galileo Inn. Daily Update: Galileo Inn. is listed in the sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker GAI. The last closing price for Galileo Inn. was -.
Galileo Inn. has a 4 week average price of - and a 12 week average price of -.
The 1 year high share price is - while the 1 year low share price is currently -.
There are currently 0 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 0 shares. The market capitalisation of Galileo Inn. is £0.
10/6/2004
13:17
jubjee: Gamblers defy FSA over £1.2m fines Date entered: 30/05/2003 Source: 3 of the City's most famous spread-betting gamblers plan to defy the Financial Services Authority (FSA) over a series of fines totalling £1.2m. Paul 'The Plumber' Davidson, former broker Nigel 'The Spaniard' Howe and Ashley Tatham, who works for spread betting company City Index, face fines of £750,000, £350,000 and £100,000 respectively. Davidson was a majority shareholder in Cyprotex, a software company that floated on the Alternative Investment Market (AIM) in February last year. A bet made with City Index could have netted Davidson £175,000 for every 1p rise in its share price. Davidson said that he would 'never, ever' pay the fine. 'The FSA has ruined my reputation, taking more than a year to investigate this.' The three men have 28 days in which to appeal against the fine.
29/3/2003
00:40
hugepants: why worry? well how about the share price? In your previous post you said "The company has assets in other viable and profit making companies" Im going to take a wild stab in the dark here and suggest this is a complete falsehood. More likely the investee companies are loss making, in dire need of cash to continue trading, and heading straight down the toilet. The current GAI share price would suggest this is true. And why are you suggesting the company is worth 3p when the directors are considering a 1.25p offer. You are losing the plot m8.
11/3/2003
08:22
sreddy: You 'experienced investors' need to learn what a 'close period' is. The directors shouldn't be talking to you anyway - certainly not to tell you any 'unpublished, price-sensitive' information. The floats are probably delayed due to the dire markets. As a previous poster said, the accounts will be very simple and will reveal the true state of affairs - certainly warranting a share price well above current levels IMHO. The company are probably busy getting the accounts finalised. I took a position in November that they would get the floats away and the share price was supported by cash. The alternative to the floats is not the company going bust, which is what the current share price is reflecting, so I can wait. Apart from staying in cash, almost any other share has gone backwards since December, GAI is relatively illiquid and has suffered on sells, particularly in February. I still think if I tried to buy 2,622,000 shares now, I wouldn't get them for 1.75p. I am certainly not selling for 1p or anything like it. Ps. 2,622,000 shares is 2.9966%.
21/2/2003
10:25
sreddy: HugePants, Your calculation assumes that the £5m raised is new money. If so, Sense-Sonic would no longer have an overdraft and there would be no need for an overdraft guarantee. SS would have £3.5m in the bank. GAI's deposit money would be released back to itself from the Barclay's account. GAI's investment in SS would be worth £0.5m, giving a profit of £0.5m in the accounts before any tax provision. That profit alone would be 0.6p per share. A float is, however, likely to be a mixture of sales by existing shareholders plus new money to repay debt to on-going levels and/or provide funds for the future development of SS. Your analysis works if GAI want to end up with 5% of the floated company, which is an OK assumption. It is the £5m needing to be raised which is the unknown, but let's stick with that assumption. If we take FCS at a valuation of £7m and assume it raises £3m for development and working capital purposes (this is a complete guess) and we assume FCS end up with 10% of the floated company, then we have the following situation: GAI would sell 43% of FCS for £3m, which I think would be virtually all profit. This is a pre-tax 3.4p per share. GAI would be left with 10% of FCS worth £1m or a pre-tax 1.1p per share. FCS would have sufficient funding and any GAI security would be released (I'm not sure whether there is an FCS security deposit). So if we take these two hypothetical situations together, GAI has it's full money available to it again (5.5p per share) and has made a pre-tax profit/revaluation of 5.1p (0.6+3.4+1.1). Being pessimistic on the tax planning opportunities available to GAI and assuming tax at 1.6p per share, leaves net assets at 5.5+5.1-1.6 = 9p per share. This includes 5.5p of cash, Astek and Scientific Detectors in for virtually nothing, but with the hidden value in GAI proved and the ability to realise that value proved in difficult markets generating large profits, and therefore in a normal world justifying a significant premium to net assets. That is why GAI could be worth 12p to 15p on flotation of one or two of its investee companies, particularly FCS, and why it was worth 20p just 12months ago. Even in a depressed, sceptical market applying a discount of 10% to net assets we have the potential of a share price of 8p per share. I would be quite happy for that to be applied to my 2,400,000 shares. Even happier at 12p - 15p. LOL. I still think that if I were trying to buy 2.4m shares now, I would push the price up significantly and wouldn't do much better than my 2.79p average (including costs). HP you must be Scottish if you need to see more of a discount before thinking it's a bargain! Admittedly this is, however, a relatively low price high spread share in a nervous market and therefore will be subject to large fluctuations as mm's shift stock. However, even if there are no floats before the accounts are published, the accounts will clarify the existence of the cash, and if there are float(s), the hidden value will be confirmed. My analysis above does not change much if GAI has to exit by way of trade sale instead of flotation, although this may take a bit longer. PS: Sometimes, HP, the best bargains are to be found when there is confusion and uncertainty and not enough information in the market. If the market is assuming the worst, or even worse than the worst, then the only way is up.
19/2/2003
09:44
sreddy: The appetite of institutions for flotations can turn on a sixpence from not interested at all to very interested and vice versa. I'm sure GAI and others must have been very surprised by the rapid turn down in institutional interest over the last two months. Maybe they were very confident in October and with sufficient reason. Delayed floats are really annoying but I'm sure there are alternative exits if the businesses can't float on suitable terms in these markets. As I say, this can change very rapidly but GAI does have the alternative of trade sales to effect an exit, although this will take more time. In the meantime GAI collect interest on £5m and fees from investees and are hardly a company on the verge of administration, which is what the share price is assuming. I have a large stake bought at an average 2.8p, which is only a 0.5p tick up on the current offer price. That can happen in 5 minutes with this share. It is people who are prepared to dump at 1.5p who are causing the drift, as the mm's will quite happily drop the offer to 2p, knowing that there are plenty of buyers at this level. I have recently mopped up 300k at less than 2p. I would not dream of selling at these silly prices and can wait. A bargain is a bargain, even if it takes a lot more time to realise than originally envisaged. With value realised even from only one flotation and followed up by maybe a trade sale, I would not be surprised to see this as a cash rich company with net assets per share of over 10p including cash of 5p, which is why I originally bought into the company. I'm also sure that the management team of this company have much bigger ideas than that. The co did float only 12 months ago and reached 20p(!), and we're not talking at the height of the tech boom. I am prepared to bet that the management team is too high powered to sit around idly at a share price of 1.875p per share. I still expect to make a lot of money out of this share. How silly to be so impatient when I've only held for 3 months!
30/12/2002
10:01
rivaldo: Vbb, Here's a post from me from back in November which might interest you. Incidentally, it was me who contacted the companies - the £10m valuation figures for each company were obtained from prior info already available and from press reports as below. Clearly no company should be so reckless as to state ahead of going out and fundraising that it would definitely raise x money at y valuation, particularly in these markets. GAI advised that the floats would occur in the new year - no firm date. My view is that in the worst case the current market cap is slightly undervalued based on cash, potential of current stakes plus Paul Davidson's investment nous and contacts. If FCS floated, even at only £5m pre new money, this stake alone should merit a doubling of GAI's current price. If FCS floats at £11m pre new money as suggested in the press, as do the others, we're off in a multi-bagger race in a very short timeframe. All IMHO, DYOR etc. "OK you lot too lazy to go buy an Express (or scan it in the newsagents like me), here's the gist of the article this morning. Rather exciting I think: -each of the 3 companies is to float on AIM on Dec 6th -each hopes to raise £6m -on flotation, each company is hoped to be worth around £17m, i.e £11m pre new-money -GAI will keep 10%-60% post-flotation -each company has a fully developed product -Paul Davidson hopes to float 5 more companies next year -FCS employs 150 (!) people -Sense-Sonic employs 170 (!) people in a £4.5m manufacturing plant. -Astek appears to be at an earlier stage, but has the base product already I have reservations about GAI: -check out the AIM admission document (it's on GAI's website) for details on the rather large salaries being paid to Board members (admittedly GAI does re-charge lots to other PD-owned companies). And check out the issue price of the original millions of shares issued to PD etc - 0.1p each!! Then work out the potential profit.... Nevertheless, the figures speak for themselves at a 3p share price or £2.7m market cap. Cash is £5.2m. 57% of FCS is worth, say, £6m on float. 13% of SS will be worth, say £1m. Astek - unknown, but say £0.5m. Plus unknown value of stake in Scientific Detectors. Cash guaranteed to investees should be recovered on float. So GAI, if these floats come off, should be worth around £12.5m, or 14p per share. Even if only the FCS float is successful, that stake alone is worth double the current market cap."
21/12/2002
16:30
mrkournikova: Just borrowing a piece written by 'rivaldo' on figures which I completely agree with. Ohhh just forgot to mention that buyers will probably pile in in order to get free shares in the floated companies before the cut off date to receive them...this could bring further uplift! FROM RIVALDO 'Here's an edited version of my post of November 11th, with bits thrown in to start with from an Express article. Any opinions? (Incidentally, why not keep to the old thread which had lots of good stuff all in one place?). -each company hopes to raise £6m -on flotation, each company is hoped to be worth around £17m, i.e £11m pre new-money -GAI will keep 10%-60% post-flotation -each company has a fully developed product -Paul Davidson hopes to float 5 more companies next year -FCS employs 150 (!) people -Sense-Sonic employs 170 (!) people in a £4.5m manufacturing plant. -Astek appears to be at an earlier stage, but has the base product already I have reservations about GAI: -check out the AIM admission document (it's on GAI's website) for details on the rather large salaries being paid to Board members (admittedly GAI does re-charge lots to other PD-owned companies). And check out the issue price of the original millions of shares issued to PD etc - 0.1p each!! Then work out the potential profit.... Nevertheless, the figures speak for themselves at a 3p share price or £2.7m market cap. Cash is £5.2m. 57% of FCS is worth, say, £6m on float assuming target valuation is reached. 13% of SS will be worth, say, £1m. Astek - unknown, but say £0.5m. Plus unknown value of stake in Scientific Detectors. Cash guaranteed to investees should be recovered on float. So GAI, if these floats come off, should be worth around £12.5m, or 14p per share. Even if only the FCS float is successful, that stake alone is worth double the current market cap! All IMHO etc' Thanks MrK
15/12/2002
17:43
swiftnick: Divina, I disagree. The reason why people invest in one share rather rather another is because they believe that the current share price for that company as determined by the market undervalues it. If the current share price was always the same as a company's "real" worth then surely there would be little point in trying to pick the winners and losers? The truth is, of course, that you can't measure "real" worth because it's subjective. And with companies like GAI a lot depends on your personal attitude towards risk. At the moment the stockmarket is highly risk-averse and the share price of GAI reflects this. What you have to decide as a potential investor is whether the current share price correctly prices the trade-off between risk and potential reward. My view is that, for me, the potential reward outweighs the risk. Then again, if I was the trustee of a widows and orphans fund I would have a different view.
15/12/2002
09:48
rivaldo: Mr K, Re ANC, wherever your ANC shares are held then that's where the Redstone/Bionex shares will be placed. And I believe it's the same as buying a share cum-div or ex-div - as long as you are the owner of the shares at the close on Dec 19th, then then you can sell on the Dec 23rd and still get the distribution. Again as with dividends, in theory the ANC share price should drop straight after the distribution by the amount of that distribution, but as the markets have not woken up to the situation (I assume as it's such a small company) I do not believe this will happen. The price is already at a substantial discount to 10.4p cash per share, and if this did happen you'd have a share price of around 3p - crazy! All IMHO, DYOR etc. Mr Lad, the same applies to GAI with any share distribution.
09/11/2002
15:57
tiredoldbroker: No, I don't hold this stock. The reason is that it went from no discussion to 120+ posts on another thread in a single day, many of the posts from the same individual. I'm probably too cautious, but to me that smacks of a possible ramp - of which there have been too many on ADVFN this year. The method - find a micro-cap stock, preferably with a high percentage of the stock firmly held and not traded, with a penny share price, fill your boots then post about it endlessly so it stays at the top of the list and lots of people see it and get suckered in at higher prices as you sell - isn't particularly clever or hard to copy. Can I also bring up another point which gives me pause. Isn't it all just a bit too tidy to be believable that it has 3 investments, each of which will float with a value of £10m ? Statistically, what are the chances of making different sized investments, for different percentages, in 3 companies, and finding a few months later that all 3 will float for exactly the same value ? Isn't it a bit unlikely ? Also, there could be a vast difference between the value of GAI's stake and the value of a company at flotation. For example, GAI hold 57% of Fluid Conditioning Systems. But the rumoured flotation to value it at £10m could involve raising new money - which means the 57% isn't worth £5.7m. For example, if the float raised £6m, GAI would only hold 57% of the old £4m, worth £2.28m, not 57% of the total worth £5.7m. I would also like to point out the incestuous relationships between many of the companies which Mr Davidson is associated with. Have a look at http://www.guardian.co.uk/Print/0%2C3858%2C4377663%2C00.html from The Guardian in March this year. Cyprotex paid a quarter of a million quid to GAI for "management services". GAI has provided a guarantee for the debts of Sense-Sonic. Sense-Sonic (despite having debts) was loaning money to Cyprotex. Oh, and Cyprotex is being sued by the University of Sheffield, which alleges theft of intellectual property. I am also a bit wary of any company which floats the way GAI did. The placing at 16p raised £6m gross, so £0.8m went in expenses - a ridiculously high figure - and valued the company at £14m. So the directors rewarded themselves with stock worth £8m or £9m, for having had such a good idea. No wonder the share price subsequently collapsed. And has anyone read the entire placing document to make sure there aren't a whole raft of options at fractions of a penny outstanding for the directors' benefit ? Has anyone actually seen the placing document, so they know what they're talking about ? Finally, have a look at the interim results issued on 22.5.02 for the 6 months to 31.3.02. Revenue from providing "management services" was £280,000, but expenses were over £490,000 ????? Just how much of that was salaries to the directors who had already filled their pockets with stock ? Isn't it all a bit "Stephen Dean" ?????
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