Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Energetix LSE:EGX London Ordinary Share GB00B19H7076 ORD 5P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.00p +0.00% 13.75p 0.00p 0.00p - - - 0 05:00:10
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Electronic & Electrical Equipment 0.0 -5.0 -5.6 - 18.22

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Date Time Title Posts
18/7/201312:35Energetix - the market's hotting up521
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DateSubject
01/10/2016
09:20
Energetix Daily Update: Energetix is listed in the Electronic & Electrical Equipment sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker EGX. The last closing price for Energetix was 13.75p.
Energetix has a 4 week average price of - and a 12 week average price of -.
The 1 year high share price is - while the 1 year low share price is currently -.
There are currently 132,505,606 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 0 shares. The market capitalisation of Energetix is £18,219,520.83.
24/4/2013
17:43
rolo7: Ever since they annouced the new manager of flow energy share price has fallen, something has to fill the nuclear power gap uk arent going to build all those nuclear powerstations in years to come surely.
18/4/2013
22:53
rolo7: The flow energy website is up and running and they are taking customers so it would seem and have the lowest tariff in the market fixed to sept 14. Very worrying the share price fall but did at this time time last year. Needs an tech update though.
17/10/2012
21:06
euclid5: Energetix Group plc, (AIM: EGX), which develops and commercialises alternative and efficient energy products, announces that following the completion of yesterday's General Meeting it has granted the following subscription options over its shares to certain of its Directors who have each released all existing share options held by them: No. of subscription options Exercise price Issued share capital of the Company* Clare Spottiswoode (Executive Chairman) 4,001,087 28p 3% Peter Richardson (Chief Executive Officer) 4,001,087 28p 3% Tony Stiff (Commercial Director) 4,001,087 28p 3% Henry Cialone (Non-Executive Director) 412,500 28p 0.3% One third of these options will be exercisable on the Company's AIM mid-market share price being maintained at 50 pence or higher for not less than one calendar month; another third will be exercisable on the Company's AIM mid-market share price being maintained at £1 or higher for not less than one calendar month; and the final third will be exercisable on the Company's AIM mid-market share price being maintained at £1.50 or higher for not less than one calendar month. These options have been granted to Clare Spottiswoode, Peter Richardson and Tony Stiff under the Company's Enterprise Management Incentive Scheme to the extent of the relevant legislative limits and the balance under the Company's Unapproved Share Option Scheme; and the options granted to Henry Cialone have been granted under the Company's Unapproved Share Option Scheme
24/7/2012
16:10
typo56: Vphase could pull this down if we are not careful. But how much do you suppose the Vphase holding (about £2m worth) is currently contributing towards the EGX share price? Not a lot I suspect.
08/4/2011
15:34
denc: my thoughts of last october appear to have been borne out i still do not see this as a great prospect for the foreseeable future and i suspect the share price will go down further from here particularly as there is considerable fear in the city of anything not producing consistent recurring cash flows best of luck to holders
02/3/2011
14:43
cyberbub: The positive news flow over the last few months has been very good. I don't hold here at the moment, as mentioned I did buy at well over 100p in 2007 but sold at a loss in 2008 when the sh*t hit the fan across the markets. What attracts me here, apart from the promising technology of course, is the large director holdings and low number of shares. Can any LTHs remind me of the projected sales figures of Kingstons? If it is true that there is a 1m-unit market in the UK, then despite the high initial price tag of the microCHP boiler, you would think that given the regulatory and cultural framework at the moment, and the direct financial payback to customers through Feedin Tariffs, EGX should be able to capture at least 5-10% of that market? Let's say just 5%, so 50K units, and of the £3.3K price tag they make £500 operating profit per unit. That would be £25M profit, let's be cautious and say £20M pre-tax, and £12M post-tax profit. Give us a modest P/E of 8 and that would be a £100M market cap. With 65M shares in issue post-placing that gives us an share price of 150p. That target is conservatively calculated, but also completely ignores the possibility of overseas boiler sales, or anything at all to do with PnU. If one was being more optimistic, would a 3-year horizon share price of 300p be wildly unrealistic? Are there any projected threats or banana skins that anyone can see? To my mind the company seems to be heading very much in the right direction at the moment. The main threat is probably from competitors in the green-boiler market, but EGX's 'USP' is the fact that they use relatively low technology (while still having IP protection) and therefore likely to be much more reliable than competitors, which is a strong selling point to customers who might be a bit nervous of new technology, as well as reassuring partners like EON that they will not suffer reputational damage from faulty units. Kingstons are also cheaper to the customer than their fuel-cell competitors (e.g. CFU, Ceres), and finally EGX's products are substantially further along in the product development pipeline. Any views appreciated.
18/8/2010
11:41
empirestate: wouldn't it be nice to see one of those 'statement re share price announcements'. do well again today on the bid for stock
04/11/2009
14:11
zap217: Article from November 'Quoted Cleantech' Time to start selling The share price of energy efficiency company VPhase has had a poor run in recent months, despite the business having passed several milestones this year. Shares in VPhase, which are quoted on London's Alternative Investment Market, slid during the summer from more than 8.5p each to less than 5p by late October. VPhase began sales of its first product, VX1, after having achieved CE certification – a prerequisite for electrical appliances before they can be sold in the UK and mainland Europe – in June. VPhase has agreements in place with British Gas Services and Scottish and Southern Energy to trial and commercialise the VX1 Smart Voltage Management device. The company also got approval from the UK's energy regulator Ofgem earlier this year to trial the device under the Government's Carbon Emissions Reduction Target scheme. The VX1 device uses a straightforward technique to reduce energy consumption in households and small businesses. It exploits the fact that voltages supplied to homes and businesses vary in order to ensure that the electricity distribution network operates effectively. Across Europe, voltages generally vary between 208V and 253V, with the UK's electricity network having a typical average voltage of around 245V. Because of this variation household appliances are required to operate at the lower end of the voltage range, which means that the electricity entering a household or business can be regulated at the fuse box to a lower voltage, so reducing energy consumption. VX1 works in a similar way to noise-cancelling headphones, creating a small, anti-phase voltage to reduce the incoming voltage to the building to 220V. So, if the incoming voltage is 243V, it applies an opposite voltage of 23V. This means that a household or small business can save around 10% of electricity usage simply by fitting VX1 to its fuse box. Having done everything it had to do in order to be able to sell the product legally in the UK and Europe, VPhase now faces its biggest question of all: will householders and businesses buy VX1? CE certification for VX1 arrived too late to make much of a difference to VPhase's interim results, covering the six-month period to the end of June. The company generated first half revenues of just £60,000 (H1 2008: £0), along with an increased loss of £412,000 (H1 2008: £356,000), so investors' eyes will be on the second half to see if VX1 is the company-maker that VPhase's management believes it should be. As well as its development of sales channels via utility companies SSE and British Gas, VPhase is developing relationships with electrical goods manufacturers and distributors, housing associations and local housing authorities. Meanwhile, it has established a website and sales hotline, as well as promoting VX1 at trade shows like London's Ecobuild. VX1 has also been featured in the press and on television in the UK. Of course, VPhase is not alone in the voltage optimisation market. For example, fellow AIM-quoted firm Cinpart owns a subsidiary, Active Energy, which sells a device called VoltageMaster that is targeted at larger, non-domestic applications such as municipal buildings, factories and commercial offices. Meanwhile, other devices that compete directly with VPhase's VX1 have been on the market for some time. In VPhase's favour is the simplicity of its VX1 device, a stand-alone product that can be readily fitted alongside a household fuse box by any qualified electrician. Also, the company believes that the market for voltage optimisation devices is set to boom as the UK Government wants to roll out related energy efficiency devices, such as smart meters, across 26 million homes and several million businesses over the next decade. For the immediate future, VPhase needs to show that the product is selling in the short term if its share price is to recover to levels seen earlier this year. A failure to shift VX1 boxes during H2 2009 would not be catastrophic for the business, which had balance sheet cash of £2.5 million (equivalent to 0.4p per share) at the end of June, but it would add to the nervousness already shown by investors in the company during the summer and autumn. A useful way for investors to get exposure to VPhase, without banking on the whole business, is via Energetix – an AIM-quoted energy efficiency business that owns around 49% of VPhase's shares. Energetix has two other subsidiaries that follow a low-risk strategy of focusing on smart, robust technologies rather than 'cutting edge' science. These are Genlec and Pnu Power. Genlec has designed a low-cost, wall-hung, micro-CHP (combined heat and power) device for the home. Although it operates like a normal domestic boiler, when the device is heating the home, or the home's hot water supply, it also generates electricity – saving the average homeowner around £200 off his annual electricity bill. Genlec has relationships with several boiler manufacturers and power utilities, giving it the potential to access all the major European boiler markets. In particular, the company has a product supply agreement with European boiler manufacturer Daalderop that is targeting sales of at least 30,000 Genlec micro-CHP units to the Dutch and Belgian heating markets over the next three years. Pnu Power has developed a new type of battery for uninterruptible power supplies (UPSs), which are used to protect critical systems from interruptions in electricity supply. The battery works by using compressed air, and the company claims that its performance exceeds that of conventional batteries in terms of both cost and reliability. Pnu Power has already received orders from the South African utility Eskom, P&E Automation in San Diego and Telecom Italia. In stark contrast to VPhase, Energetix's share price has done very well since the spring. In May, the company's shares were changing hands for as little as 28p each, but they were trading for around 55p each in late October.
13/5/2009
20:58
zap217: Heres an article from proactive investor dated 9th April 2009. May explain a little. Thursday, April 09, 2009 Energetix: worth the sum of its parts? by Jon Mainwaring The worldwide financial crisis has been responsible for frightening plenty of investors away from the stock market. Of course, the most common way of judging how frightened investors are of equities is by looking at the performance of stock market indices over the past couple of years, but another sign that investors must still be scared to death of equities is the number of companies out there with market caps below net asset value and/or cash holdings. The phenomenon of large numbers of companies being valued well below their net asset value was last seen during the dot.com boom, when shares in many firms were trading below their cash value. This was because plenty of firms had been able to raise huge sums not long before the market turned sceptical of Internet-based business models. However, although many listed dot.com and Internet-related software firms did in fact quickly burn through their cash piles and disappear, there are today several firms that not only survived the bursting of the dot.com bubble but have since thrived. Of course, many of these companies have since been taken private because management and owners recognised value where the market would not. But it is worth remembering that FTSE-100 firm Autonomy, which makes search software, saw its share price trade as low as 91.25 pence amid the dot.com doom and gloom of 2002 before their long, steady rise to today's price of more than £14 (although this is still way off its flotation price of £32.76 in November 2000 when it floated on the London Stock Exchange). One sector that saw plenty of fund raisings before the recent financial crisis has been the clean energy industry. But today, as clean energy indices such as the Envirodaq index have reached all-time lows, there are several clean energy businesses whose shares are now trading well below net asset value. One such firm is Energetix Group. Energetix is an Alternative Investment Market-quoted developer of 'new energy' products that are based on what it describes as robust, proven technologies. By focusing on distributed generation and energy storage, it has already grown three subsidiaries that develop and commercialise new products in these markets. The first of these subsidiaries, VPhase, itself joined AIM in September 2007 via a reverse takeover. Today, it has a market capitalisation of approximately £44m and Energetix still retains 49% of the business. Yet, despite the stake in VPhase being currently valued by the market at £21m and Energetix's cash balance of £11m (equivalent to 20 pence per share) at the end of last year, the group's current share price of 28.5 pence values the entire group at just £15.7m. According to Ken Rumph, an analyst focusing on climate change-related companies for investment bank Noble, VPhase is a tightly-held share and not traded much. This could explain some of the discrepancy in the firms' respective valuations, but it does seem odd that the market is placing a combined value of Energetix's stake in VPhase and its other subsidiaries of under £5m – especially since VPhase recently launched its first product while the two other businesses are also close to becoming fully commercialised. VPhase exemplifies Energetix's overall low-risk strategy of focusing on smart, robust technologies rather than "cutting edge" science. Its first product, VX1, is a simple device that uses a straightforward technique to reduce energy consumption in households and small businesses. The VX1 device exploits the fact that voltages supplied to homes and businesses vary in order to ensure that the electricity distribution network works effectively. Across Europe, voltages generally vary between 208V and 253V with the UK's electricity network having a typical average voltage of around 245V. Because of this variation household appliances are required to operate at the lower end of the voltage range, and this means that the electricity entering a household or business can be regulated at the fuse box to a lower voltage, so reducing energy consumption. VX1 works in a similar way to noise-cancelling headphones, creating a small, anti-phase voltage to reduce the incoming voltage to the building to 220V. So, if the incoming voltage is 243V, it applies an opposite voltage of 23V. This means that a household or business can save around 10% of electricity usage just by fitting VX1 to its fuse box. Already, VPhase has agreements in place with British Gas Services and Scottish and Southern Energy to trial and commercialise the VX1 device. And in January energy regulator Ofgem gave approval for the trialling of VX1 under the UK government's Carbon Emissions Reduction Target scheme, so the device will be trialled in a number of Scottish and Southern Energy's customers' homes (the cost of the trial is being met by Scottish and Southern). Energetix's other two businesses are Genlec and Pnu Power. Genlec has designed a low-cost, wall-hung, micro-CHP (combined heat & power) device for the home. Although it operates like a normal domestic boiler, when it is heating the home, or the home's hot water supply, it also generates electricity – saving the average homeowner around £200 off their annual electricity bill. Genlec now has six relationships with boiler manufacturers and power utilities, giving it the potential to access all the major European boiler markets. In particular, the company has a product supply agreement with European boiler manufacturer Daalderop that is targeting sales of at least 30,000 Genlec micro-CHP units to the Dutch and Belgium heating markets over the next three years. Pnu Power has developed a new type of battery for uninterruptible power supplies (UPSs), which are used to protect critical systems from interruptions in electricity supply. Its battery works by using compressed air, and the company claims that its performance exceeds that of conventional batteries both in terms of cost and reliability. Pnu Power has already received orders from the South African utility Eskom, P&E Automation in San Diego and Telecom Italia. Certainly, all three of Energetix's subsidiaries are still at an early stage of commercialisation and there is always the prospect that none of these businesses becomes a success in the long term. But investors looking to benefit from a growing focus on energy efficiency by utilities and consumers might see the discrepancy between the respective valuations of Energetix and its 49%-owned subsidiary VPhase as a tantalising opportunity.
24/4/2008
16:51
cestnous: April 24, 2008 Energetix Expects To Move To Commercialisation Of Its Combined Heat And Power Units Next Year By Ivor Watt Energetix boss Adrian Hutchings is proud of the simplicity of his company's Genlec combined heat and power (CHP) unit, which he hopes will soon begin to challenge standard household boilers as an energy efficient way of powering and heating the home. "Basically it's a fridge running backwards," is Hutchings' layman's description of the system, which uses standard off-the-shelf engineered components which the company has managed to engineer down into the size of a standard wall-mounted boiler. Using a patented 'organic rankine cycle' system the Genlec unit appears to be much closer to commercialisation than the fuel cell-driven products being developed by rivals such as Ceramic Fuel Cells and Ceres Power. At the time of Energetix's recent results Mr Hutchings re-emphasised the progress the company has already made with specific reference to two partnership agreements with boiler manufacturers, and a commercialisation agreement with energy company E.ON. Energetix's partner, the Dutch boiler maker Daalderop, already has a boiler in advanced testing and aims to have several units out in homes later this year. That development will be followed by a full ramp up to commercial sales in 2009, aimed to coincide with a Dutch government plan to install 10,000 CHP units in homes during 2009. Mr Hutchings is confident in the progress of the Genlec system and expects to have "coverage across the whole of Europe" by the end of this year through signing development agreements with between six and eight partners. Although he accepts there "is still a lot to do" in terms of perfecting the technology, Mr Hutchings is confident of Energetix's ability to make Genlec units in volume for somewhere in the region of £700 each. But Energetix is by no means a one trick pony. It has a second product on the cusp of a commercial breakthrough in the form of Pnu Power, which is also competitively challenging fuel cell-driven products for a share in the market for back-up power. With battery technology proving increasingly deficient in the face of ever higher and more demanding power situations, such as telecoms establishments, demand is growing for more environmentally friendly alternatives. Several companies are developing fuel cell-driven products but few have achieved a commercial breakthrough yet. Pnu Power uses a simpler compressed air alternative which has the advantage of a lower level of volatility than the hydrogen or methanol mixes required by fuel cells. Pnu Power has secured its first commercial sale to South African utility Eskom, where frequent power failures are increasingly threatening power hungry installations. Mr Hutchings expects Pnu power to sell "tens" of systems this year, using Eskom the "springboard for the future". Real volume sales expected to come through in 2009. After a fundraising last August, Energetix is well funded. It ended 2007 with £12.8 million in the bank, money that should see the company through to true commercialisation of both its products. Energetix also has a retained interest in Vphase, a company it spun out onto Aim late last year. Vphase has developed an energy efficiency product which can be added to fuse boxes to regulate the power being supplied to electrical products. Domestic voltage supplies in Europe tend to fluctuate between 207 volts and 253 volts, but the Vphase product standardises the power supplied to a property at 220 volts, typically saving around 10 per cent of the energy supplied. The first phase of development is aimed at the UK, but Mr Hutchings is excited about the prospects for introducing Vphase into the US market, where he believes it could become a US$1 billion business. Energetix has retained a 55 per cent stake in Vphase and Mr Hutchings serves as its chairman, maintaining close links. At 93p Energetix's share price has held up reasonably well despite the sell off across smaller companies. As it edges closer to commercialisation the company's shares could respond enthusiastically. It has some way to go yet, but it's nonetheless further down the line than most other green technology development companies. http://www.poweralternatives.com/nc/power_stories/display_news/article/energetix-expects-to-move-to-commercialisation-of-its-combined-heat-and-power-units-next-year/398.html
Energetix share price data is direct from the London Stock Exchange
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