Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Debtmatters Group LSE:DEBT London Ordinary Share GB00B09HB648 ORD 10P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.00p +0.00% 7.26p 0.00p 0.00p - - - 0.00 05:00:10
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
- - - - 1.79

Debtmatters Share Discussion Threads

Showing 3726 to 3743 of 3750 messages
Chat Pages: 150  149  148  147  146  145  144  143  142  141  140  139  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
23/6/2015
09:06
The Greek deal is not done yet maestro and any outcome will just be a fudge with the can being kicked down the street again.People believe what they want to believe it might surprise you to know
mrcravat
23/6/2015
05:03
SCREW THE MMS AND SHORTERS!
temmujin
06/5/2015
02:06
UK10Y, DE10Y and US30Y yields have upside markers respectively at 2.075, .350 and .475 depending on the election, 0.675 then .700 and the questionably close 2.950 then 3.090, .275 and .475
tpaulbeaumont
08/12/2013
09:12
Even if your mortgage debt was cut - you would still be paying the same every month just for a shorter period. Also Iceland has a small population - I dread to think how much this measure would cost our government if they ever considered it!
knigel
08/12/2013
09:08
i bet this news doesnt get aired on the BBC or mainstream media
temmujin
07/12/2013
21:32
Iceland to write €24,000 off every household mortgage Despite international opposition, the Reykjavik government will press ahead with the debt relief plan. Tue 10:14 AM 30,603 Views 93 Comments Share2231 Tweet193 Email55 The Blue Lagoon, Grindavik, Iceland The Blue Lagoon, Grindavik, Iceland Image: Chris Ford via Flickr/Creative Commons THE ICELANDIC GOVERNMENT has announced that it will write off household mortgage debt in order to kickstart the economy. Under the plan, every household in the country will have €24,000 worth of debt written off. The move was part of the election manifesto of the Progressive Party, led by Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson. The idea will cost the country €1.2 billion and will begin in mid-2014. Iceland has been burdened with debt since the 2008 financial crisis, which saw the krona collapse. A government statement said that the plan would kick-start consumer spending. "Currently, household debt is equivalent to 108 per cent of GDP, which is high by international comparison. "The action will boost household disposable income and encourage savings." The plan has been criticised by the IMF, the OECD and various economists, with the IMF saying that the country has "little fiscal space" for the move, while the OECD says the plan should be limited to low income housing. The measure has improved the country's rating with Standard & Poor's, who upgraded the economic outlook from negative to stable.
temmujin
27/2/2013
14:02
http://ftalphaville.ft.com/2013/02/27/1401982/on-negative-interest-rates-and-hoarding/
tpaulbeaumont
13/12/2012
22:13
http://uk.advfn.com/cmn/fbb/thread.php3?id=26810964
tpaulbeaumont
13/12/2012
16:00
Tpau Would you be so kind as to put the bund in the header please ?
mark knopfler
04/9/2012
07:04
http://ftalphaville.ft.com/blog/2012/09/04/1144321/moodys-eu-outlook-moved-to-negative/ The negative outlook on the EU's long-term ratings reflects the negative outlook on the Aaa ratings of the member states with large contributions to the EU budget: Germany, France, the UK and the Netherlands, which together account for around 45% of the EU's budget revenue. The creditworthiness of these member states is highly correlated, as they are all exposed, albeit to varying degrees, to the euro area debt crisis. Moody's believes that it is reasonable to assume the same probability of default by the EU on its debt obligations as the highest rated key members states' probability of default. Whereas Moody's acknowledges that there are structural features in place that enhance the EU's creditworthiness, they are in Moody's view not sufficient to delink the EU's ratings from the ratings of its strongest key member states. In particular, in the event of a scenario of extreme stress in which Aaa-rated member states would default on their debt obligations, 1) defaults on the loans that back the EU debt would be highly likely, 2) the EU's cash reserve would likely be stressed, and 3) the EU member states would likely not prioritise their commitment to backstop the EU debt obligations over the service of their own debt obligations. Hence, it is reasonable to assume that the EU's creditworthiness should move in line with the creditworthiness of its strongest key member states.
tpaulbeaumont
16/8/2012
08:39
http://fistfulofeuros.net/afoe/unlocked-handcuffs/
tpaulbeaumont
26/7/2012
17:19
Ooof, feel the burn, roughly 10% in 2 sessions for the current basketcases
tpaulbeaumont
23/7/2012
09:09
i think its safe to say Spain was always a goner, just a matter of when Italy is next in the hot seat though, and is obviously significantly larger, its certainly got problems, but theyre not exactly the same as spain. yields are still a way off their highs
tpaulbeaumont
28/6/2012
08:13
Spain over 7%, Italy multi-month breakout (not near ATHs though, yet)
tpaulbeaumont
30/5/2012
10:24
http://www.economist.com/blogs/buttonwood/2012/05/euro-zone-crisis-4 Eurobonds: il conto, la cuenta, l'addition, die Rechnung May 29th 2012, 14:14 by Buttonwood ONE plan to resolve the euro zone debt crisis is for the common issue of eurobonds - each country's debt would be guaranteed by all the others. The rationale is that the overall level of European debt is not that high, when compared with the US; it is just distributed in an awkward way. David Owen of Jefferies has come up with a ready reckoner, by assuming that euro zone debt would trade at the weighted average (based on issuance) of current yields (excluding Greece). Thus the cost of annual issuance for Germany would rise from the current 1.4% to 3.7%, while yields in Italy, Spain etc would fall. The result would be an annual cost for Germany of €49 billion, or around 1.9% of GDP. France would pay an extra €16 billion, or 0.8% of GDP. the Netherlands, Austria and Finland would all face costs of around 1% of GDP. That may not seem too bad a deal, given the predictions of the pain caused by a Greek exit, although it is worth pointing out it is an annual cost, not a one-off.
tpaulbeaumont
27/5/2012
08:37
http://www.economist.com/node/21555931 Europe's weaker economies are in the grip of a worsening credit crunch May 26th 2012 | London, Madrid and Rome | from the print edition
tpaulbeaumont
10/5/2012
18:36
http://www.economist.com/blogs/buttonwood/2012/05/debt-crisis not only has there been no national deleveraging since the credit crunch, but we've all levered up more!
tpaulbeaumont
28/3/2012
12:30
http://ftalphaville.ft.com/blog/2012/03/28/940271/spain-in-the-spotlight/
tpaulbeaumont
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