Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Chariot Plc LSE:CRT London Ordinary Share GB00B0P0XQ12 ORD 1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.00p +0.00% 0.48p 0.00p 0.00p - - - 0.00 05:00:10
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
- - - - 0.34

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Date Time Title Posts
25/9/200911:46Chariot UK -2,895.00
22/8/200715:08Chariot, Edison forecast eps of 107p for 08, share price 172p, PE UNDER 2102.00
23/11/200615:43Update on Chariot Plc-
04/10/200612:24CRT was JOBS (yesterday)611.00
04/10/200612:23CRT - ROCKET RISER!!!36.00

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DateSubject
16/1/2007
12:33
scribbler101: powwow - make them an offer! They don't seem to want much! RNS Number:5908P Chariot (UK) PLC 16 January 2007 For immediate release 16 January 2007 Chariot (UK) plc ("Chariot" or the "Company") Share price movement The Board of Chariot have noted the recent increase in the price of the Company's shares. Following the announcement made by the Company on 6 December 2006 the Board have been evaluating proposals received from a number of parties relating to the disposal of the Company's assets. If any transaction were to be undertaken by the Company the Board expects it to be announced imminently although, at this time there can be no certainty that any transaction will proceed. Should no transaction take place imminently the Board will be forced to commence an orderly closure of the monday lottery as ticket sales continue to be below the level required to sustain the game. Any transaction, whilst being cash positive and aimed at securing the future of the monday lottery, will not realise a significant amount of cash for the Company.
27/11/2006
13:36
scottrorke: I think that today's share price fall (and slight tightening of the spread) is a "tree-shake" to enable market-makers to buy-up shares. I'd welcome knowing if anyone out there agrees or disagrees. Thanks in advance.
24/10/2006
21:00
ihavenoclue: someuwin - 31 Mar'06 - 09:48 - 48 of 2421 Well, If we extrapolate those figures above we can see that: At Year End 2007 with expected Earnings Per Share of 107p ... If we take a modest PE ratio of 10 we get a Share Price of £10.70 If we take an average PE ratio of 15 we get a Share Price of £16.05 If we take a higher PE ratio of 20 we get a Share Price of £21.40 It certainly makes today's £1.60 look extremely good value! ................................... and someulose .... famous last words !!!
03/6/2006
09:36
safman: http://news.independent.co.uk/business/news/article624237.ece Rival lottery firm hits financial crisis By Susie Mesure Published: 03 June 2006 A rival to the National Lottery that styled itself the "draw for the unlucky" when it launched four weeks ago has proved to be even unluckier for the investors who backed the company behind it. Chariot, which operates the Monday charity lottery, yesterday dropped a bombshell on its shareholders when it revealed it was close to collapse less than four months after listing on AIM, London's junior stock market. The company admitted it was running out of money and warned it was planning an urgent cash call at a vast discount to the value of its stock. It blamed a lack of interest in Monday, which had hoped to attract players by offering them much better odds on much smaller prizes than the National Lottery. It also promised the internet-based lottery would be much more generous than its bigger rival, paying 30p of every £1 waged to its charity partners, or 2 per cent more than Camelot. In February, Chariot raised £9.6m from investors including Fidelity International and New Star Asset Management to fund the high-profile launch of its new lottery. Its shares listed on AIM at 115p and quickly soared to a peak of 210p, which gave the company a market valuation of £29m. Yesterday it said it would be issuing an unquantified number of new shares at 5p a throw - 77 per cent less than the level its shares closed at on Thursday. The stock fell from 21.5p to 8p, valuing Chariot at a shade over £1m. It is not clear how much money the company will need to raise to stay afloat. City traders have been watching the company's plummeting share price with growing alarm over the past few weeks. Even before yesterday's announcement, the stock had fallen by three-quarters in the past two weeks, yet the company had not provided any explanation. In a stock exchange statement yesterday, Chariot said ticket sales and income generated were way behind expectations, which meant it could not fund its original business plan. In the four lottery draws held since 8 May, it has sold 1.68 million tickets. This compared with expectations at its launch it would sell 5 million a week. At a minimum, it needed to sell 2 million weekly tickets to break even. Its promises of raising £150m a year for its 70-odd charity partners, which include Barnardo's and the National Autistic Society, have also fallen far short of expectations. It has raised £520,000 for the 20 charities participating in its four draws so far, yet on its original maths it should have raised almost £12m for them by now. Chariot spent £8m marketing the Monday lottery in a national television advertising campaign. Monday has been plagued by disappointment since its launch when technical problems - ironically due to higher-than-anticipated demand - hampered ticket sales. On that first draw, some 9,800 winners shared around £250,000 in prize money. Peter Jones, Chariot's deputy chairman, who also chairs the Tote, said the draw on 5 June would go ahead as the money waged by players was ring-fenced from the company's finances. "The consumer is not affected by this whatsoever," he added. The past month has seen several huge jackpots on offer from Camelot of up to £18m, which industry observers believe has sucked dry all lottery appetite among prospective punters. Chariot is meeting its investors to gauge whether they will back its attempt to concoct a new business plan. Not backing the cash call will effectively pull the plug on the business. Key numbers April 2003: Suzanne Counsell, a charity worker, founded Chariot with the aim of giving more money to charities than the National Lottery. 6 February 2006: Chariot listed on the Alternative Investment Market, selling 8.4 million new shares to investors at 115p per share. 21 April 2006: Shares peak at 210p, valuing Chariot at £29m. More than 50 charities are signed up to benefit from the new game. 8 May 2006: First lottery game suffers technical problems. Ticket sales disappoint. Shares begin to slide amid a dispute over the grant of free shares for directors. 2 June 2006: With its shares at 21.5p, Chariot admits it is running out of cash. Prepares to ask investors to subscribe to new shares at just 5p. A rival to the National Lottery that styled itself the "draw for the unlucky" when it launched four weeks ago has proved to be even unluckier for the investors who backed the company behind it. Chariot, which operates the Monday charity lottery, yesterday dropped a bombshell on its shareholders when it revealed it was close to collapse less than four months after listing on AIM, London's junior stock market. The company admitted it was running out of money and warned it was planning an urgent cash call at a vast discount to the value of its stock. It blamed a lack of interest in Monday, which had hoped to attract players by offering them much better odds on much smaller prizes than the National Lottery. It also promised the internet-based lottery would be much more generous than its bigger rival, paying 30p of every £1 waged to its charity partners, or 2 per cent more than Camelot. In February, Chariot raised £9.6m from investors including Fidelity International and New Star Asset Management to fund the high-profile launch of its new lottery. Its shares listed on AIM at 115p and quickly soared to a peak of 210p, which gave the company a market valuation of £29m. Yesterday it said it would be issuing an unquantified number of new shares at 5p a throw - 77 per cent less than the level its shares closed at on Thursday. The stock fell from 21.5p to 8p, valuing Chariot at a shade over £1m. It is not clear how much money the company will need to raise to stay afloat. City traders have been watching the company's plummeting share price with growing alarm over the past few weeks. Even before yesterday's announcement, the stock had fallen by three-quarters in the past two weeks, yet the company had not provided any explanation. In a stock exchange statement yesterday, Chariot said ticket sales and income generated were way behind expectations, which meant it could not fund its original business plan. In the four lottery draws held since 8 May, it has sold 1.68 million tickets. This compared with expectations at its launch it would sell 5 million a week. At a minimum, it needed to sell 2 million weekly tickets to break even. Its promises of raising £150m a year for its 70-odd charity partners, which include Barnardo's and the National Autistic Society, have also fallen far short of expectations. It has raised £520,000 for the 20 charities participating in its four draws so far, yet on its original maths it should have raised almost £12m for them by now. Chariot spent £8m marketing the Monday lottery in a national television advertising campaign. Monday has been plagued by disappointment since its launch when technical problems - ironically due to higher-than-anticipated demand - hampered ticket sales. On that first draw, some 9,800 winners shared around £250,000 in prize money. Peter Jones, Chariot's deputy chairman, who also chairs the Tote, said the draw on 5 June would go ahead as the money waged by players was ring-fenced from the company's finances. "The consumer is not affected by this whatsoever," he added. The past month has seen several huge jackpots on offer from Camelot of up to £18m, which industry observers believe has sucked dry all lottery appetite among prospective punters. Chariot is meeting its investors to gauge whether they will back its attempt to concoct a new business plan. Not backing the cash call will effectively pull the plug on the business. Key numbers April 2003: Suzanne Counsell, a charity worker, founded Chariot with the aim of giving more money to charities than the National Lottery. 6 February 2006: Chariot listed on the Alternative Investment Market, selling 8.4 million new shares to investors at 115p per share. 21 April 2006: Shares peak at 210p, valuing Chariot at £29m. More than 50 charities are signed up to benefit from the new game. 8 May 2006: First lottery game suffers technical problems. Ticket sales disappoint. Shares begin to slide amid a dispute over the grant of free shares for directors. 2 June 2006: With its shares at 21.5p, Chariot admits it is running out of cash. Prepares to ask investors to subscribe to new shares at just 5p saffy..
18/5/2006
16:00
oliesmith: I am not very clued up on shorting, but doing it over a spread bet makes sense. Spread betting is quite a good way of earning money but can be quite dangerous if you don't put in realistic stop losses. When you spread bet, you stake an amount of money you wish to gamble per point (penny). For e.g. ACRussell has a £25 stake per point IF CRT share price goes down. Every point (penny) they move downwards, ACRussell makes £25. However, there is an initial buy/sell spread of 7.5 points (pence). So before he can make money, he needs to defeat the 7.5 point spread to earn money. So currently, with no action, he already is down £25 x 7.5 = £187.5. So to be in the blue, he needs CRT to be worth 70.5 pence. Once he hits that target, he has made £12.50. Then for every point (pence) that CRT drops, he gains £25. So guessing they drop to his realistic wanted level of 50p, he'll gain £512.50. I hope this explains it properly. I've never actually done spread betting, but I believe this is how it works. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.
09/5/2006
14:27
bubble pricker: Oh dear, 500,000 tickets sold for the first draw according to the RNS. And given the novelty factor fading away, sales could well drop off over the next couple of weeks. Chariot expects to earn revenue of 11p per ticket sold, so assuming sales remain at this level, that would be £2.8m gross revenue per annum. Assuming a 10% operating margin in line with operating margins at Camelot, this gives EBITDA of £280,000 per annum. This would give an after tax profit of, say £200,000. At the current market cap of £20m, that's a p/e of 100 of which even the most daring technology share would be proud. Given that this kind of business, once its customer takeup has settled, has virtually no growth prospects, a p/e of around 10 would be appropriate, once that stage has been reached. On the above figures, and today's first draw sales figures, we conclude that to even justify today's share price, sales will have to increase tenfold over, say, the next two years. To justify a higher share price, sales will have to increase even more. If you hold the shares then that's what you will have to believe in. In my view, as expressed before on here, the sales figures will not increase significantly from here. The lottery will languish with sales between £0.5 and £1m per week. On my above calculation, that will translate into a share price of 13 to 26p. However, that assumes they can make a profit with that level of ticket sales. Given the fat cat director emoluments of £500k per annum, I doubt they will, and I now repeat my prediction, CRT will be back for more captial within 12 months. I will watch the next two draws, and if it looks like they settle in at £0.5m sales per week, this share will be a no brainer long term short, all the way down to 13p.
20/4/2006
08:13
someuwin: The potential earnings here make a compelling case to add at these levels ... Indicative forecasts - taken from Edison for 2007E/2008E (@price 115p) Year, T/0(M), PBT, EPS, DPS, PE, Yield 2007E, 390, 28, 107, 25, 1.1, 21.7 2008E, 585, 40, 137, 30, 0.8, 26.1 So, If we extrapolate those figures above we can see that: At Year End 2007 with expected Earnings Per Share of 107p ... If we take a modest PE ratio of 10 we get a Share Price of £10.70 If we take an average PE ratio of 15 we get a Share Price of £16.05 If we take a higher PE ratio of 20 we get a Share Price of £21.40
31/3/2006
10:51
plantronics: Tole - 31 Mar'06 - 08:46 - 47 of 48 Indicative forecasts - all I have is off Edison for 2007E/2008E (@price 115p) Year, T/0(M), PBT, EPS, DPS, PE, Yield 2007E, 390, 28, 107, 25, 1.1, 21.7 2008E, 585, 40, 137, 30, 0.8, 26.1 Make of them as you will... someuwin - 31 Mar'06 - 09:48 - 48 of 48 Well, If we extrapolate those figures above we can see that: At Year End 2007 with expected Earnings Per Share of 107p ... If we take a modest PE ratio of 10 we get a Share Price of £10.70 If we take an average PE ratio of 15 we get a Share Price of £16.05 If we take a higher PE ratio of 20 we get a Share Price of £21.40 It certainly makes today's £1.60 look extremely good value! Thanks guys - much appreciate those forecasts and hard effort here. I have just bought a few more. When they do a launch and people hear about the 107p eps forecast this could really multiply.imho. If it got to £40 it wouldnt be totally crazy would it>? always dyor.
31/3/2006
10:37
someuwin: ...And if we then look further to Year End 2008 we can see that: with expected Earnings Per Share of 137p ... If we take a modest PE ratio of 10 we get a Share Price of £13.70 If we take an average PE ratio of 15 we get a Share Price of £20.55 If we take a higher PE ratio of 20 we get a Share Price of £27.40 Certainly looks promising to me!
31/3/2006
08:48
someuwin: Well, If we extrapolate those figures above we can see that: At Year End 2007 with expected Earnings Per Share of 107p ... If we take a modest PE ratio of 10 we get a Share Price of £10.70 If we take an average PE ratio of 15 we get a Share Price of £16.05 If we take a higher PE ratio of 20 we get a Share Price of £21.40 It certainly makes today's £1.60 look extremely good value!
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