Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Boustead LSE:BOU London Ordinary Share GB0031037798 ORD 10P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.00p - - - - - - - - -
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
General Financial 0.1 -0.3 -4.0 - 0.00

Boustead Share Discussion Threads

Showing 76 to 97 of 100 messages
Chat Pages: 4  3  2  1
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
24/3/2006
13:08
net assets of 1108K gives NAV of 15p now
nissi beach
22/3/2006
13:54
looks like we need to read small print on proposal
nissi beach
22/3/2006
13:39
Still sounds a bit dodgy to me. What is a "registered bond instrument" for instance? That said, I'm sure shareholders have a bit more hope than they did yesterday.
wiganer
22/3/2006
13:30
happy ending?
sharegod
24/6/2005
15:02
Note the bottom of this article with regard to Boustead. Could be back on soon? Easier rebels hit at 'smoke and mirrors' of missing £5.4m By Harry Wallop (Filed: 24/06/2005) The battle to find the whereabouts of £5.4m belonging to Easier, the shell company whose shares were delisted from the Alternative Investment Market last year, took another twist yesterday at an ill-tempered emergency meeting. Rebel shareholders were thwarted in their attempt to oust the directors they blame for problems at the company, which include the resignation of Deloitte & Touche as auditors, the sacking of its nominated adviser and a failure to file accounts for either 2003 or 2004. The two board members, David Gough and Andrew Milne, resigned hours before the meeting, saving themselves the embarrassment of being voted off by shareholders, who had enough votes to force them out. Shareholders were left to vent their frustration at Brian Copsey, the company's general manager, who had been co-opted to the board by the departing directors. One shareholder, Graham Stevens, rounded on Mr Copsey for refusing to give an update on the company's sole asset, £5.4m in cash. "Why is it so difficult to tell people where the cash is. Is it in Barclays around the corner? Why is it so difficult? We are all just so fed up." Another shareholder accused Mr Copsey of using "smoke and mirrors". A clearly ill at ease Mr Copsey, who was frequently asked by shareholders to speak up, laid out his plans for the company. Fulton Partners, of which he is a director and which holds 26pc of Easier, will make a cash offer to shareholders of 22p a share, equating to £5.4m. Shareholders who do not want to take up this offer will end up with shares in a new company. This new company will buy a stake in a gas field in Texas with "provable reserves", said Mr Copsey, and then intends to float on Aim. Shareholders repeatedly asked for details of the new company's directors, brokers and advisers, which Mr Copsey was unable to give, though he insisted that they were all "reputable City firms of note". The deal constitutes a takeover and therefore the new company has 28 days to make a formal offer document, complete with qualified accounts of Easier. John Strachan, the second director co-opted to the board, promised: "There will be no further nonsense at this company." Intriguingly, Mr Copsey promised that Boustead, another company delisted from Aim in which Fulton has a stake, is "weeks away" from revealing the whereabouts of its asset, £2.6m in cash.
raygun
15/2/2005
12:02
Old geyser? Type "sir thomas macpherson" into google. Much respect. re independant article, 2+2=5 Raygun
raygun
14/2/2005
09:57
StewJames - 14 Feb'05 - 09:39 - 41 of 41 What's with the old geysers? 74 year old and 84(!) year old chairmen? Not like they've got all that much to lose if caught with their hands in the till is it?! LOL! Perfect age for an "Ernest Saunders" style bout of ill health in prison(If guilty) followed by compassionate release and miraculous recovery.... Rgds dell All IMHO, DYOR etc.
dell314
14/2/2005
09:39
What's with the old geysers? 74 year old and 84(!) year old chairmen? Not like they've got all that much to lose if caught with their hands in the till is it?! Why do you never see these jobs where you get £100000 for doing absolutely nothing advertised in the papers? Anyone know how you go about getting one?
stewjames
13/2/2005
23:53
By Stephen Foley 14 February 2005 Small Talk The Independent Fulton Partners, an offshore investment company run out of Mayfair in London, is at the centre of two similar mysteries at cash shell companies, where auditors cannot find the main asset: millions of pounds of cash. Fulton, chaired by 74-year-old David Gough, is the main shareholder and investment adviser to Boustead, a former engineering company whose shares were suspended last week in a dispute over the whereabouts of £2.6m. But it also controls Easier, an AIM-quoted shell which was delisted last year, leaving hundreds of small shareholders in the dark about its financial affairs. There, an even bigger sum of money is unaccounted for. It has emerged that Easier's auditors, Deloitte, have quit, telling the company: "During the course of our audit, we have requested information regarding the company's investments. This information has not been forthcoming". Its statement was filed at Companies House in December, after Easier made an unsuccessful legal bid to have it blocked or changed. It was not, however, distributed to Easier's shareholders, who have been unable to trade the stock since its suspension last June. A spokesman for Easier said the company is less than two weeks away from getting its disputed financial results signed off by new auditors, and it would update shareholders then. He said the company is planning a return to AIM after completing a reverse takeover deal. Easier floated at the height of the dot.com boom as an online estate agent but got out of that business and has lain dormant since 2001, with £5.4m in the bank. Fulton Partners took control in September 2003, when Mr Gough became chairman. On 30 June 2004, one day before the shares would have been automatically suspended because the company had failed to file its accounts, the company asked for trading to be halted. It said it was in talks over a property deal. Shareholders have heard nothing since but it is understood that the deal did not go ahead. The company said over the weekend that its assets were now £5.5m, with £3.4m of that in quoted US equities, although its spokesman declined to give details of when the money might have been invested in American stocks or what those stocks might be. "It is right that shareholders should be told first," the spokesman said. Mr Gough declined to discuss Easier directly with Small Talk, and he denied any role in the disputed events at Boustead. Mr Gough's partner at Fulton is Brian Copsey. The pair were paid £200,000 last year by Boustead for work to find merger and acquisition activity for the company, although its chairman, 84-year-old Sir Thomas Macpherson, said he has since cut that fee to £100,000 because of dissatisfaction with their performance. Boustead's chief executive since July 2003 is the Cayman Islands-based Robert Lyons, an associate of Messrs Gough and Copsey. Boustead's shares were suspended last week by the Financial Services Authority, "pending clarification of its financial position". The company's auditors, Kingston Smith, refused to sign off its last accounts, saying that it could not account for £2.6m. Sir Thomas said the money had been lent to a business partner in the Far East, which needed security for a government engineering contract, and that Fulton had been involved in setting up that deal. "The contract was [arranged by] Mr Lyons, the contacts were a joint effort," he said. Boustead said last year that the money was held in the Cayman Islands and the paperwork to prove its existence had been delayed because of hurricanes in the autumn. Now it has been moved to a Hong Kong bank, where the Chinese New Year had delayed the preparation of the necessary documents, Sir Thomas said. Boustead said last week that it wanted to sack Kingston Smith for alleged breach of confidentiality, but the auditors say it wouldn't be in the best interests of shareholders to quit until the money has been found. Boustead must decide whether to go ahead with an extraordinary shareholder meeting to oust them. Kingston Smith would then get a public opportunity to set out the details of their search for the cash and their ongoing concerns. Mr Gough, however, is not on the board of Boustead and will therefore not have to face public questions unless Easier returns to AIM. Small Talk, like Easier's hundreds of small shareholders, is eager to see that happen.
m.t.glass
13/2/2005
23:51
By Stephen Foley 14 February 2005 Small Talk The Independent Fulton Partners, an offshore investment company run out of Mayfair in London, is at the centre of two similar mysteries at cash shell companies, where auditors cannot find the main asset: millions of pounds of cash. Fulton, chaired by 74-year-old David Gough, is the main shareholder and investment adviser to Boustead, a former engineering company whose shares were suspended last week in a dispute over the whereabouts of £2.6m. But it also controls Easier, an AIM-quoted shell which was delisted last year, leaving hundreds of small shareholders in the dark about its financial affairs. There, an even bigger sum of money is unaccounted for. It has emerged that Easier's auditors, Deloitte, have quit, telling the company: "During the course of our audit, we have requested information regarding the company's investments. This information has not been forthcoming". Its statement was filed at Companies House in December, after Easier made an unsuccessful legal bid to have it blocked or changed. It was not, however, distributed to Easier's shareholders, who have been unable to trade the stock since its suspension last June. A spokesman for Easier said the company is less than two weeks away from getting its disputed financial results signed off by new auditors, and it would update shareholders then. He said the company is planning a return to AIM after completing a reverse takeover deal. Easier floated at the height of the dot.com boom as an online estate agent but got out of that business and has lain dormant since 2001, with £5.4m in the bank. Fulton Partners took control in September 2003, when Mr Gough became chairman. On 30 June 2004, one day before the shares would have been automatically suspended because the company had failed to file its accounts, the company asked for trading to be halted. It said it was in talks over a property deal. Shareholders have heard nothing since but it is understood that the deal did not go ahead. The company said over the weekend that its assets were now £5.5m, with £3.4m of that in quoted US equities, although its spokesman declined to give details of when the money might have been invested in American stocks or what those stocks might be. "It is right that shareholders should be told first," the spokesman said. Mr Gough declined to discuss Easier directly with Small Talk, and he denied any role in the disputed events at Boustead. Mr Gough's partner at Fulton is Brian Copsey. The pair were paid £200,000 last year by Boustead for work to find merger and acquisition activity for the company, although its chairman, 84-year-old Sir Thomas Macpherson, said he has since cut that fee to £100,000 because of dissatisfaction with their performance. Boustead's chief executive since July 2003 is the Cayman Islands-based Robert Lyons, an associate of Messrs Gough and Copsey. Boustead's shares were suspended last week by the Financial Services Authority, "pending clarification of its financial position". The company's auditors, Kingston Smith, refused to sign off its last accounts, saying that it could not account for £2.6m. Sir Thomas said the money had been lent to a business partner in the Far East, which needed security for a government engineering contract, and that Fulton had been involved in setting up that deal. "The contract was [arranged by] Mr Lyons, the contacts were a joint effort," he said. Boustead said last year that the money was held in the Cayman Islands and the paperwork to prove its existence had been delayed because of hurricanes in the autumn. Now it has been moved to a Hong Kong bank, where the Chinese New Year had delayed the preparation of the necessary documents, Sir Thomas said. Boustead said last week that it wanted to sack Kingston Smith for alleged breach of confidentiality, but the auditors say it wouldn't be in the best interests of shareholders to quit until the money has been found. Boustead must decide whether to go ahead with an extraordinary shareholder meeting to oust them. Kingston Smith would then get a public opportunity to set out the details of their search for the cash and their ongoing concerns. Mr Gough, however, is not on the board of Boustead and will therefore not have to face public questions unless Easier returns to AIM. Small Talk, like Easier's hundreds of small shareholders, is eager to see that happen.
m.t.glass
11/2/2005
20:26
I understand the debtor is secure. I spoke to the auditor (who is not so certain about the debtor), Peter Timms, just rung him up. He spent 20 mins on the phone telling me what he thought of the business and the debt. This is not an auditor i would want to engage and he ought to learn a little about client confidentiality. I'm ok to sit back and wait on this one, although bear in mind that this is still a risky shell stock. It does, however, have Sir Tonmmy in the chair, he has integity in buckets, and some pretty experienced people working on making something of it. Raygun
raygun
11/2/2005
09:36
Does anyone have an inside track on what the hell this means? No doubt the shareholders are going to to get stuffed once again
nick9962
19/1/2005
08:10
OK thanks, you seem to have a bit of an inside track on these, I have held them for some time, i hold stakes in a few "shells" lets hope they do well Good Luck Nick
nick9962
17/1/2005
13:02
i understand i only to be a matter of time. Much activity going on behind the scenes on this one.
raygun
17/1/2005
12:09
Thanks raygun, presumably we have still not heard from the compnay on these though? Cheers Nick
nick9962
14/1/2005
11:12
What deals are you referring to ? Nick
nick9962
12/1/2005
13:53
Today's announcement is a bit of a relief. Hopefully the evidence should be sufficiently strong to indidicate the reality of the monies shown on the balance sheet. Those deals anounced earlier last year are well overdue by now. I expect this to start moving in the early part of this year. I'm talking to myself here anayway, so it won't matter what i say.
raygun
22/12/2004
18:46
Well they are certainly busy. Whether all this activity will lead to a stonking great success in the new year, only time will tell. odd / troubling that the issue of the main debtor, the huge majority of the co.s assets, still is not resolved.
raygun
28/7/2004
20:01
i also got out a few days ago market cap now 1.81m v 1.66m so not the discount it once was
nissi beach
28/7/2004
16:07
Looks like my timing was particularly useless on my sale
ben value
28/7/2004
08:22
I've just sold 6000 at 20p having bought at 14.5p. No reason for selling except to part fund the purchase of a motorbike!
ben value
06/7/2004
14:28
20K absorbed by mm nicely Proves they are short and want some stock onboard for the rise (when it comes)
nissi beach
Chat Pages: 4  3  2  1
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