Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Bhp Billiton LSE:BLT London Ordinary Share GB0000566504 ORD $0.50
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +19.50p +1.81% 1,097.00p 1,096.50p 1,097.00p 1,110.00p 1,088.00p 1,088.00p 6,611,673 16:29:59
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Mining 23,258.8 -5,461.8 -90.3 - 23,169.43

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Date Time Title Posts
24/9/201610:10bacon lettuce and tomato12,569
30/8/201623:57Analysts' View on BHP Billiton (BLT)-
22/6/201609:36BHP BILLITON155
16/11/201515:44BHP BILLITON(overvalued and heading for Ј6)key shareholders DUMPING STOCK113
08/10/201410:21BHP will try to crowd the marginal producers out-

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Trade Time Trade Price Trade Size Trade Value Trade Type
17:13:021,091.713,87242,270.91NT
17:09:541,093.5310,546115,324.14NT
17:04:431,099.758,49093,369.03NT
17:03:541,102.706,09067,154.19NT
17:02:591,100.64300,0003,301,926.30NT
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DateSubject
28/9/2016
09:20
Bhp Billiton Daily Update: Bhp Billiton is listed in the Mining sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker BLT. The last closing price for Bhp Billiton was 1,077.50p.
Bhp Billiton has a 4 week average price of 1,019.58p and a 12 week average price of 1,004.95p.
The 1 year high share price is 1,203.50p while the 1 year low share price is currently 571.60p.
There are currently 2,112,071,796 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 9,560,381 shares. The market capitalisation of Bhp Billiton is £23,169,427,602.12.
05/4/2016
10:15
anley: If there is a world glut of steel - and there is - then at some point the Chinese will stop IO imports. When that happens the price of IO will go down and that will impact on the cash flow and subsequent profitability for BLT. Simple economics and that is why the BLT share price is drooping nearly every day...........
09/3/2016
09:33
loganair: Jefferies downgraded miner BHP Billiton to 'hold' from 'buy', as it argued that commodity prices are set to decline. It pointed out that even after Tuesday's "carnage", the share price is still above its 800p target price as commodity prices have been stronger than expected, sentiment on mining has improved, and shorts have covered. "While the Chinese demand outlook may be slightly better than it was two months ago and more metals-intensive stimulus may be coming, our analysis indicates that most commodity prices will go lower in the near term," Jefferies said. It said the recent strength in prices of iron ore, copper and other mined commodities will at least partially reverse over the next three to six months. As far as iron ore is concerned, supply growth from Roy Hill and a seasonal increase in supply following what have been typical weather-related supply disruptions should pressure the price, especially if demand stays weak, Jefferies said. It expects the iron ore price to fall to below $40/t this summer from current spot of $64/t. As for copper, it said a wave of supply growth should more than offset any improvement in demand and push prices lower. "Based on our commodity price forecasts rather than current, higher spot prices, BHP's valuation is stretched," Jefferies said. "In addition to a fairly expensive valuation (on our estimates) and the likely negative momentum of lower commodity prices in the near term, there are also still questions regarding BHP's recently announced strategic overhaul, which includes major changes to divisional management and a regrouping of segments." Analysts at investment bank Goldman Sachs appear to agree. They suggest that the iron ore rally would prove temporary while it also reiterated that oil prices would fluctuate between US$20 and US$40 a barrel. Brent oil was sitting at US$39.80 overnight, suggesting it could be nearing its highest point based on Goldman Sachs’ estimates. What’s more, the Goldman Sachs analysts have also suggested that copper prices are set to fall. Together with iron ore and petroleum (as well as coal), copper is one of BHP’s most important commodities so this would not bode well for the miner. And the bad news is, we see little prospect of these businesses being turned around given general trends in the global economy. After all, the one thing you don’t do is fight a trend. The commodities supercycle has ended decisively, and we expect the price of minerals and metals such as iron ore to continue to fall. In the 1990s, the iron ore price used to sit at around $10 per dry metric ton, roughly a quarter of where it is now. Thus share prices in this sector will continue to be eroded. There will be no dramatic rebound to this rout. What does the future holds for mining companies, "the worst is yet to come."
08/2/2016
10:24
loganair: BHP Billiton expected to cut dividend payouts to investors amid commodity rout - By business reporter Sue Lannin. The world's biggest miner is under pressure to slash dividend payouts to investors when it releases its half-year results later this month, as the price of resources like iron ore and oil plummet. Falling commodity prices, multi-billion-dollar write-downs and the mine disaster in Brazil have crunched BHP Billiton's share price and earnings. Resources analyst, David Lennox, said BHP is expected to post a loss for the first half of the 2016 financial year. "They will report a loss primarily on the back of the fact that they will have to write-down and the company has already flagged impairment charges against their assets," Mr Lennox told The Business. "So we are expecting earnings to come in at zero to minus $250 million for the half year result." BHP warned to get rid of current dividend policy: Giuliano Sala Tenna, investment adviser at Bell Potter Securities, said BHP should get rid of the policy. "I think it confirms what a lot of market commentators have been saying for a long time now that it's a little bit foolhardy for BHP to be blindly wedded to a progressive dividend policy when clearly the earnings are under a lot of pressure," Mr Sala Tenna told The Business. Last year the big miner paid out $US6.6 billion in dividends. It made $US1.9 billion in net profit in 2015, down nearly 90 per cent from 2014. Aberdeen Asset Management is BHP's second biggest investor in Australia and it believes the progressive dividend policy is unsustainable. Aberdeen's head of Asia Pacific Credit Research, John Manning, said he expected BHP to halve interim dividend payouts from $US0.62 to $US0.31. "What they need to do is make the future distributions more sustainable," Mr Manning said. "That, in our mind, moves it away from a progressive toward a percentage payout ratio, something along the lines of a percentage of free cashflow." But Matthew Haupt, portfolio manager at Wilson Asset Management, said the loss of the progressive dividend would be a blow for mum and dad investors. "Retail investors like dividends so I think if BHP cut their progressive dividend it [will] definitely send a signal to the retail investor about the future income from this company," Mr Haupt said. At the last November annual general meeting BHP chairman Jac Nasser refused to guarantee the progressive dividend policy as the company faced a barrage of questions from the media. Mr Lennox thinks the miner will not cut dividends until its annual results are released in August. He said no dividend cut could mean BHP would have to rely on debt to pay dividends to investors. "There is no doubt if they do borrow heavily or borrow more to actually pay out a current dividend rather than perhaps use money to focus on growth then you would expect the credit ratings [agencies] would look at downgrading them a little further," Mr Lennox said. Mr Haupt thinks BHP will not cut its dividend until later in the year at the annual results, even if that means another credit ratings downgrade. "Even if they cut the dividend by 50 per cent so they will still be pushing along the bottom end of the S&P range so there is a definite possibility the rating gets cut to A- after the result," Mr Haupt said. Mr Manning wants to see BHP Billiton take urgent action to keep its A credit rating by cutting dividends and capital spending. "The cards have laid on the table by the ratings agencies. Now is the time for management to step up to the table and to act," Mr Manning said. More pain predicted for share price: BHP Billiton's woes have seen its share price drop by half over the past year to a low of $14.06. Barclays predicts the share price could fall to $10.50. Mr Haupt said Wilson Asset Management would be prepared to buy BHP shares if the price fell below $10. "Under $10 you would definitely have to have a look at it because the company produces quite a bit of cash and I think the underlying assets are of acquired value," Mr Haupt said. Mr Sala Tenna said there are more risks for BHP if the resources rout continues. "BHP does have leverage to the energy markets so if we see a recovery in those prices that would signal a short term trough in their share price, but certainly the outlook for iron ore and copper looks fairly challenged over the next 12 months," Mr Sala Tenna said. Despite the challenges, Mr Manning says Aberdeen Asset Management plans to keep investing in BHP Billiton. "They are in our minds one of the strongest mining companies globally so they are very well positioned if we do go into a sustained downturn," he said.
02/2/2016
12:18
loganair: BHP Billiton - One of growth investing legend Jim Slater’s tips for investing in turnarounds was that you should only buy when profits are expected to increase over the next year. BHP meets that requirement. Earnings are expected to hit a new low of $0.26 per share during the current year, before rising by 76% to $0.45 in 2016/17. Although BHP stock still looks pricey, on a forecast P/E of about 21 for next year, I think the group should be quite well-positioned for any recovery. BHP’s balance sheet remains reasonably strong and the group has reduced operating costs and cut capital expenditure. Any rise in the price of oil, iron ore or copper should feed straight through to BHP’s profits. One risk investors do need to accept is that BHP’s dividend may be cut. Current forecasts indicate that the miner will pay a total dividend of $0.85 per share this year. This gives a potential yield of 9.3% at the current share price of 635p. Although BHP has been reluctant to cut the dividend, a reduction is now widely expected among City analysts and might not have much effect on the group’s share price. There’s no doubt that BHP will recover from the current commodity slump. I don’t think there’s a big rush to buy, but at close to 600p I think the price is starting to look quite attractive. Indeed, on a three-to-five-year view, I think a 50% gain might be possible from here.
20/1/2016
08:14
loganair: By Ryan Newman - Time to Sell? The headwinds facing BHP Billiton couldn’t be clearer. Although it maintains well-diversified operations, all of its key markets (iron ore, petroleum, copper and coal) are suffering from falling resources prices, with little hope of a recovery anytime soon, while China – BHP’s key market – is also growing at its slowest rate in a quarter of a century and trying to transition away from infrastructure growth. Add in the prospect of weaker earnings and a slashed dividend yield, and the case is hardly compelling for BHP Billiton. In saying that however, the share price has fallen to its lowest level in more than a decade as a reflection of these issues. While I still don’t believe BHP Billiton shares are a buy right now, investors still holding the shares may want to think twice before selling as well. Of course, there is always the possibility of further losses in the near-term, but the risk vs. reward payoff does seem to have improved. As tempting as it may seem to put some money to work in BHP Billiton at this historically low share price, investors need to be aware of the risks and headwinds which threaten to drag the shares even lower. Indeed, BHP Billiton’s largest customer, China, is now growing at its slowest rate in 25 years. Its growth is expected to continue slowing with commodity prices also expected to continue falling, perhaps sharply. As a price taker, commodity prices are something that BHP has very little control over which does make the future very uncertain. Investors who buy today could be rewarded in the long-run, but even at their current price tag, I believe investors have a better chance of achieving superior returns by looking elsewhere in the market.
11/1/2016
17:01
loganair: By Kevin Godbold - A year ago, many were attracted to the big mining firms because of high dividend yields and low forward price-to- earnings ratios. BHP Billiton, Rio Tint and Anglo American looked attractive on traditional valuation measures. However, I was bearish on the firms and explained why in an article published on 12 January 2015. Today, with the shares of those firms much lower than they were a year ago, I’m still bearish and think it’s too soon to revisit the sector. The crucial ‘buy’ signal is missing today, just as it was a year ago. What signal? The thrust of my article last year was that it’s better to think of the miners as cyclical firms through-and-through. What their businesses produce has low differentiation and little added value. As such, the commodity companies have almost no pricing power. The problem with cyclical firms for investors is that valuation indicators tend to present upside down. The big miners can look the most attractive on valuation grounds just at the point when they’re the most dangerous – just before the next profit and share price collapse, as we’ve seen lately. It’s therefore risky to justify an investment through the lens of traditional value or income measures. Instead, it makes sense to me to wait for the signal of momentum before buying. At the very least, I want to see flatlining charts for the big miners’ share prices and for the underlying commodities that they produce. Ideally, the charts will be turning up, providing evidence that the bottom of the fall in prices might already have occurred. Beware false signals: I would argue now that a return to the big miners is an investment decision that has no urgency. I’m not expecting the miners to snap back up fast, so I’ll look for evidence of a turn in the commodity markets over months, perhaps even years, rather than weeks. I was wrong, for example, to wonder whether it was time to buy the miners in a second article published on 4 February 2015. That was a false signal, although I did urge caution even in that article. Fortunately, despite wondering whether the time was right, I didn’t buy any miners’ shares in February last year. When I look at the share price charts today of miners such as BHP Billiton, Rio Tinto and Anglo American, and at the price charts for commodities such as iron ore, oil and copper, I still see a downtrend over a one-year period. To me, that means the crucial ‘buy’ signal for the mining companies is still missing, just as it was a year ago. When it comes to investing in the big mining companies, I think it seems likely that the best strategy from here is one of slothfulness. Even then, I would argue, the big miners are for trading to try to catch the upturn after a cyclical bottom.
08/1/2016
10:48
loganair: orinocor - Depends whether one is looking short or long term. In my good opinion, long term I'd plump for BLT as it is one of the lowest cost miners of the commodities it mines and therefore when the prices begin to pick up again there is a greater likelihood of BLT share price gaining more than RIO with also a higher dividend yield, going forward long term. I am a new investor into BLT and invested knowing there is a good probability of BLT dividend being cut by up to 50%, any thing less will be just an added bonus. Coal, one of the 4 main comedies BLT mines - India has announced the building of 30 coal fired power station to increase electricity generation 4 fold. 'India imports 18.9 million mt coal in December, up 11% on month.'
14/12/2015
18:42
loganair: By Harvey Jones - Anglo American was going to have to cut its dividend sooner or later, so it’s better it acted sooner rather than let the uncertainty drag on into next year. Unfortunately, all it has done is sharpen the focus on those FTSE 100 mining giants that have yet to cut their dividends, BHP Billiton and Rio Tinto. Cuts, cuts, cuts Rather than the end of the story, this is beginning to look like the start of a trend for miners. With share prices plunging, juicy yields were the main reason to stay true to the commodity sector but now these are being squeezed dry. Anglo-American tried fighting the inevitable with cost slashing and asset disposals, but had to give way in the end. The yield hit an unsustainable 14% by the time it acted, announcing last week that it would axe its workforce by more than half from 135,000 to 50,000, and suspend dividend right to the end of next year. That will save Anglo American about £1bn a year, money it desperately needs to survive lower prices. Even when the dividend does return, it will no longer be progressive, something management claims is unaffordable in the notoriously cyclical mining sector. Triple Trouble Even more worryingly for BHP Billiton and Rio Tinto, by slashing £1bn from capex and canning plans for new mines it’s effectively saying there is enough commodity supply today to last for years to come. Rio Tinto quickly followed Anglo American’s lead to announce $1.5bn of capex cuts by the end of next year. There was no talk about cutting the dividend, but markets seem to be pricing that in, with the share price down 10% in the last week. That’s the problem when the dividend comes under pressure, the share price collapses as well. BHP Billiton has also been burning through cash and looks even more vulnerable. Its share price is down more than 12% in the past week. Citi reckons it will burn through around $3bn a year. With BHP hit by institutional downgrades, its payout must surely be on borrowed time. In A Hole The situation at BHP Billiton and Rio Tinto isn’t quite as drastic as at Anglo American. Their yields haven’t yet hit double digits, but BHP is close at 9.23%, so you can draw your own conclusions. Rio currently yields 7.15%. Commodity prices continue to fall, with iron ore hitting a seven-year low of around $40 a tonne. Both companies are clearly at the sharp end of a cyclical shift in China, a shift that only looks set to sharpen. The mining sector is notoriously cyclical. At some point, all this cost slashing will lead to supply shortages and force up prices again, but it would take an optimist to suggest we’re at that point now. Larger operators appear to be following the Saudi strategy of maintaining high-margin production to drive out low-margin rivals and hang onto market share. Commodity prices may have further to fall in the new year. Unless they recover sharply, I fear that BHP Billiton and Rio Tinto’s dividends will fall as well.
11/12/2015
09:42
loganair: The rebound in BHP Billiton share price proved short lived following what was another night to forget for global commodity markets. Indeed, today’s plunge appears to have been caused by further weakness in the iron ore and oil prices overnight. Rio Tinto's) share price has also retreated 0.5% after iron ore fell 1.4%, according to the Metal Bulletin, while oil prices are hovering near their lowest levels in six years as well. Brent oil fell nearly 1% to US$39.72 a barrel, while West Texas Intermediate crude was at US$36.71 a barrel on speculation that OPEC will keep the market oversupplied to force prices lower. Iron ore and oil are BHP’s two most important commodities, and contribute the bulk of its earnings. Lower prices will generate less revenue which will impact both cash flows and earnings. It could also impair BHP’s ability to continue increasing its six-monthly dividend payments to shareholders. Should you buy? BHP Billiton is ever reliant on commodity prices remaining reasonable to ensure it can grow its earnings. While it is admittedly doing a good job of cutting costs, it is simply not enough to offset the impact of falling commodity prices which could continue to weigh on its performance, and its share price. While today’s price tag could prove to be a bargain in hindsight, right now it seems there are too many risks and headwinds facing the sector to justify an investment in BHP, especially when there are so many other attractive opportunities also presenting themselves.
23/7/2015
03:58
bobsidian: "...only 14 per cent above its 115-year average of $39 a tonne." And as we all know bear markets have a habit of falling below averages particularly when mining entities extract at a pace to maximise the potential for marginal income whilst choosing to ignore whether or not there is an end market for their output. Utter insanity. It will be interesting to see the share price performance of BLT tomorrow on the back of the latest broker recommendations. As usual you cannot help but get the impression that brokers are following rather than leading share price movements. The management of the big guns in the mining world may be about to realise that not even they are immune from the consequences of breaching any debt covenants. The share price performance of STAN - one of the banks perceived as most exposed to the debt of mining companies - may be interesting going forward. Noteworthy that AAL tracked the move lower by BLT, that the share price of AAL is not just trading below its 2009 low but is trading at a 13 year low, and that AAL is announcing its interim results on Friday. It will be interesting to see whether or not AAL moves to scale back its dividend payout. It may be that market forces are moving the AAL share price in anticipation of such an announcement. If this is indeed the case then it is anyones guess as to its share price reaction on Friday given that AAL has also pre-advised on as much as a further $4 billion of accelerated asset writedowns linked to commodity price performances for the year to date. If the share prices of BLT,RIO and AAL continue to tumble then the only way the FTSE100 will be able to resist a significant fall is by continuing to push ever higher its insanely overvalued constituents. PRU,NXT,WTB,ARM amongst many others come to mind whose valuations currently seem in the realms of La La Land and by so being they seem to be pricing too distant a future into the present.
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