Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Berkeley Group Holdings LSE:BKG London Ordinary Share GB00B02L3W35 ORD SHS 5P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +13.00p +0.39% 3,316.00p 3,318.00p 3,320.00p 3,330.00p 3,290.00p 3,300.00p 567,841 16:35:11
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Household Goods & Home Construction 2,723.5 812.4 467.8 7.1 4,567.42

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DateSubject
24/6/2017
09:20
Berkeley Group Holdings Daily Update: Berkeley Group Holdings is listed in the Household Goods & Home Construction sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker BKG. The last closing price for Berkeley Group Holdings was 3,303p.
Berkeley Group Holdings has a 4 week average price of 3,041p and a 12 week average price of 3,041p.
The 1 year high share price is 3,421p while the 1 year low share price is currently 2,015p.
There are currently 137,738,711 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 666,481 shares. The market capitalisation of Berkeley Group Holdings is £4,567,415,656.76.
10/6/2017
10:59
1gw: jrphoenixw2 - the BKG site shows the prelims are due on 21st June - a week on Wednesday. So I think the "closed period" is 60 days ahead of those results and we would be well within it now. Their last buyback was on 6th April and I think normally companies have to make special arrangements and issue an RNS to say they intend to continue a buyback through the closed period, if that's what they want to do. So it may be that they can't buy back any shares until 21st June, even if the share price falls below what they regard as the appropriate trigger point. But if the outlook hasn't deteriorated markedly since 6th April then I think I would expect them to re-commence buybacks on 21st June if the share price is below about £31 at that time. But a level around £31 may still act as resistance to the downside in the meantime if enough traders & investors believe that BKG will be in the market at up to about that level later in the month.
07/6/2017
06:52
garycook: Bargain buy While the prospects for the UK property sector have deteriorated, the buying opportunity for long-term investors may have improved. For example, Berkeley Group (LSE: BKG) continues to trade on a low valuation with a relatively high yield. Certainly, the prospects for the prime property market have worsened in recent months. The potential exodus of financial professionals and the uncertainty brought about by Brexit may lead to lower demand for prime property, but weaker sterling could help to offset this somewhat by encouraging foreign buyers to invest. With Berkeley now trading on a price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio of 7.3, it appears to offer a wide margin of safety. Its dividend yield stands at over 6%, and yet is covered more than twice by profit. This suggests its future dividend payments are highly affordable and could provide an inflation-beating income stream for the company’s investors over a sustained period. Although UK house prices may fall and this may lead to some share price volatility in the near term, Berkeley appears to offer a mix of value and income potential for the long run. As such, even after a 12% rise since the start of the year, its share price could move higher.
30/5/2017
14:01
typo56: Now if BKG want to unleash a blast of buy-backs this afternoon I'm not going to complain! Buy-backs may help to increase the share price, but not necessarily the market cap, which is what FTSE is based on. That said, FTSE don't take account between reviews of changes to shares in issue of less than 10%, so it might work!
06/4/2017
15:02
jrphoenixw2: Fenner: So he is NOT allowed to take advantage of the share price like you or I ? Me: No that’s not what I mean, rather it’s that such sales are usually handled less bluntly IME, so they have less of an impact on other share-holders. But I do appreciate he is in an invidious position, being owner of a huge holding, and at his age, vs a stock that has the relative illiquidity of a FTSE-250 company. Fenner: Perhaps you could enshrine it in his contract of employment - as long as you work for us you are only ever allowed to buy. Me: Again, not what I mean. Perhaps my experience has been different. Where I worked [and in general in the financial industry] if a director sold such a slab it usually came together with a statement. Those often would explain that the sale was for diversification [re-investment elsewhere], philanthropy, or to release funds for the exercise of options, and so on. The explanations were never surprises, but the market observed closely and such statements signalled that the director was alert to the sensitivity of the matter. From that experience [and maybe expectation?] you can see why his sale raised my eyebrows; not least as the ‘damage’ caused will be repaired at our collective expense. It would be interesting to see a plot of the timing of his sales vs buy-backs this week. 1gw: I can understand shareholder displeasure at the very high level of his total remuneration because of the LTIP payouts Me: Not from my side. As long as staff remuneration is correlated closely to company and personal targets, I have no problem with high pay. It’s more re: how the other share-holders got dumped on as a result, and further that the ‘damage is being repaired’ at the expense of our div. Anyway... the matter seems to have divided opinion into two pretty clear camps, and that fact alone shows that there IS a problem. Perhaps just one of perception. But I do hope the next shareholder meeting doesn’t bring questions about any perceived conflict of interest in overseeing buy-backs whilst off-loading large slabs of stock. I’d be surprised if the institutional Notifiable longs aren’t wondering what is going on. RTGT: [they] ceased buying before the results at around 2980. Moreover they haven't yet continued with the programme at these higher levels. Me: You presumably hadn’t seen the RNS at the time you wrote that... Date of transaction: 5 April 2017 Number of Shares purchased: 150,000 Highest price paid per Share: 3095p Lowest price paid per Share: 3062p Volume weighted average price paid per Share: 3080.1710p RTGT: And how exactly is reducing the share count in any way detrimental to the interests of any single shareholder. On the contrary it's a net positive. Think it's important to realise Pidgley is 69 and has the vast bulk of his fortune tied up in this company, and net of this sale still has a huge interest in the business. Personally for me I see it as a fantastic opportunity to profit from this nonsensical volatility and buy more Me: I don’t have a problem with buy-backs, IDR now precisely but with my views, I’d have voted for board remuneration as it is and the buy-back scheme. I take your point on age though, he’s earned it so should be enjoying it. But RNS’s don’t reveal the directors age, and until you mentioned his I hadn’t considered it, so again the risk is it’s an issue of market knowledge/perception. I can also see that there are two camps in this regard, yours that see it as a buying opportunity, vs those like me who have no wish/need to buy more but see the impact vs their capital and div-stream. Fenner: It might as well be up yours to the men who make the money... Me: Again that’s not my view. But we’ll see what if any questions it might raise at the next shareholder meeting. @RTGT-re2857: It’s good to see the share-count reduce further, but as mentioned^ it’d be interesting to know whether this buy-back in part ‘repaired the damage’ from his same-day sale. It's that lack of clarity thing again... [All IMHO/2C etc., it's being interesting to read the spectrum of views on this!]
05/4/2017
19:55
1gw: I really don't understand this debate about Tony Pidgley selling some shares. From looking through the FY16 annual report and subsequent directors holdings rns's it seems to me: 1. At end-FY16 (30th April 2016) Obligation (on Tony Pidgley) to hold shares: 113,522 shares (4 x base salary / £29.95 share price) Shares actually held: 6,463,855 Or as the annual report puts it: Obligation to hold 400%, actual holding 22,776% 2. During FY17 27th June 2016 - bought 35,061 shares at £22.69 each 30th September 2016 - option exercised on 545,368 shares vested from 2011 LTIP, shares transferred to wife 4th April 2017 - sold 1,000,000 shares at £31.10 each. 3. Current position Shares actually held: 5,498,916 beneficial in his name + 545,368 (presumably) still in wife's name. So in summary: He has skin in the game (about 6m shares between him and his wife not forgetting remaining 2011 LTIP options); He still holds way, way more than the obligatory 400% base salary in shares; He made a purchase when the share price was struggling in the low 20's post-referendum, making a public display of confidence. I wish the executive directors of all the companies I invest in were as publicly aligned with shareholders as he is. What is there to complain about? Oh yes, selling after introducing a buyback! Here again, I do not really understand the criticism. Assuming he believed that (1) the share price in the mid-high £20's was materially undervaluing the company and (2) he was likely to want to sell a relatively small proportion of his shares some months later, what should he have done? It seems to me that delaying the share buyback until after he had sold would not have been an optimal solution for shareholders, and neither would accelerating his sale so that he was seen to sell at a relatively low price just before he introduced a share buyback - how would the market have interpreted his comments on the share price undervaluing the company if he had just sold before the program started? I can understand shareholder displeasure at the very high level of his total remuneration because of the LTIP payouts (although presumably shareholders were happy enough to think about the targets being met when they were put in place), but I really don't think criticism of this share sale is justified.
05/4/2017
17:16
fenners66: And who is responsible for the value of the company? As you say "Directors selling material chunks of their holdings is a sensitive matter [usually/IME]. In the PLC where I spent my later career it was taboo". So he is NOT allowed to take advantage of the share price like you or I ? Perhaps you could enshrine it in his contract of employment - as long as you work for us you are only ever allowed to buy. Also you must do your utmost to create wealth for the rest of us to buy and sell on a whim. After all we will need to sell from time to time. Maybe he wants to buy a new house, maybe a yacht who knows? He's sold a whole days volume worth of shares, shock ! But what about last week , last month every days shares sold , is that not taboo that anyone should sell? The difference is that if I sell my shares no one notices or cares even if its £m's. If I sell those shares it sends a signal to the market that some idiot who has no idea this is going higher has foolishly sold. But we read into it that if Pidgely sells he knows so much more - thats why the price has gone down - but Directors can be stupid as well. There is a director at GVC - whenever he sells large chunks the share price goes up! Every one takes it as a contrary signal. Thus no one cares any more. So he gets credit for hard work and timing a sale. I would have given far more support to the idea that they should be paying dividends and not doing buy backs. I was a buyer here for yield - BUT the tone of this board for the past 6 months has been the buybacks have been a good idea and have supported the share price - no one complained at that.
20/3/2017
10:04
shanksaj: "I shorted this today. A rising interest rate environment wont be helpful for this company. Target £20 or lower by year end." Dim, Companies which are in debt are good to short when interest rates are going up because the cost of interest payments on the debt will increase. Companies which pay no dividend are good to short because whenever a dividend is paid a shorter in that company has to pay up. Companies which have little free cash are good to short because they cannot start share buy back schemes to support the share price. With Berkeley, it has a lot of free cash: it can defend its share price; if interest rates go up it will earn more on that cash; it will be paying up to £2 per share per year in dividends which you as a shorter will have to cough up. You might be right, but its a big risk you are taking. As interest rates rise the cost of development land will decline setting Berkeley up for when interest rates start to decline. Its good to have cash in this business... and Berkeley has lots of it.
27/2/2017
08:00
jrphoenixw2: They were buying back shares on Friday. 34,864 at average px 2889.9256 = cost £1,007,500. Meanwhile share price rose 25p or +0.87%. With 138,458,579 shares in issue they spent a million and saw 34.6* that back in the share price.
20/2/2017
15:08
1gw: That's me in for another chunk at 28.72, a month after my first purchase. Hoping the weakness today is due in part to Bovis results, which may be counteracted by Galliford Try's interims tomorrow, Barratt on Wednesday and Persimmon & TW finals next week. Feels like once again we may be heading for "lower for longer" on interest rates and on the BKG price we're again getting to "Pidgley Put" territory - the price at which I would expect BKG to be buying back shares in the market.
09/9/2016
15:19
henrylightningbolt: BKG share price has fallen a little over a 100 points since I sold. Should I consider buying back today or wait?
Berkeley Group Holdings share price data is direct from the London Stock Exchange
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