Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Agriterra Ld LSE:AGTA London Ordinary Share GB00B05MGT12 ORD 0.1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.005p +2.86% 0.18p 0.16p 0.20p - - - 53,750.00 16:35:03
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
General Financial 12.8 -5.3 -0.6 - 1.91

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Date Time Title Posts
20/11/201609:27AGRITERRA GROUP - Aiming High in Africa1,422.00
30/4/201518:23Agriterra Ltd925.00
28/2/201314:26Agriterra - African corn and beef with a dash of oil972.00
12/3/201221:56Agriterra - African corn and beef with a ash of oil2.00
01/3/201209:48Movement in Agriterra1.00

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DateSubject
07/12/2016
08:20
Agriterra Daily Update: Agriterra Ld is listed in the General Financial sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker AGTA. The last closing price for Agriterra was 0.18p.
Agriterra Ld has a 4 week average price of 0.16p and a 12 week average price of 0.18p.
The 1 year high share price is 0.59p while the 1 year low share price is currently 0p.
There are currently 1,061,818,478 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 897,504 shares. The market capitalisation of Agriterra Ld is £1,911,273.26.
27/7/2016
13:05
baa: beggars belief that they had three private aircraft , but at least common sense has prevailed and they are sold for c£400K net . That's 25% of the whole market cap...hence the small share spike. Will also reduce operating costs by hundreds of thousands. Liquidation of the herd will generate several million in cash by the look of the last accounts and leave a profitable feedlot and a profitable retail operation . If they could sell or rent the land they own , there is value of a multiple of the current share price . A big IF , but they seem to understand there is asset value there and which should be being released back to shareholders.
20/11/2015
07:26
amt: As expected so already in the share price. Value of the company One third of net assets. They are confident about having enough cash going forward and of a recovery in maize. I expect share price will end somewhere near current price.
27/2/2015
09:49
baa: results truly dreadful management making the same worthless statements as they have for the last two years .Little or no growth , non existent margins and huge cash burn . The net asset value is just a stupid statement - they have no cash to develop cocoa even if they could and if the land valu in Moz was actually worth that , they should sell it ! Cash will disappear in the next 18-24 months and well before that , the share price will wilt even further in anticipation of fund raising . The only solution is for management to sell and get what they can for the Moz assets . Unfortunately turkeys don't vote for Christmas.
15/12/2014
13:53
amt: very strange share price reaction. Perhaps triggering stop losses to get some stock for somebody who wants to invest a lot. All recovered again, very strange.
31/10/2014
11:32
baa: you're an optimist cyfran! only a year ago a director was saying they'd turn a profit in the near future .That was nonsense . As you say , 2-3 years away and then they are hardly likely to be making £1m , which you need to justify a mkt cap of even £10m, Add onto that a massive hint that Sierra Leone is only salvageable if they get lots more funding and you understand why the market has the price right. Their communication strategy is very poor and if they believe the share price is way too low , either the directors should step up and buy or they should put out a clear forecast of when the moz operations will move into the black and how all the overheads are justified . A£600K pa board looks excessive in the context of the progress made. Only hope in my eyes is that someone comes in to buy the assets , because they believe they can be managed better .
29/4/2014
00:06
jazzyjeffnett: the kariba dam situation could be a bit of a drag on the share price, as tete would be impacted, money has been raised to fix the dam but not all that would be required? peeps don't like uncertainty but this could be the reason for the drop in the share price
25/9/2013
07:28
the count of monte_cristo: Good Morning All - Please see the answers to our questions below. The reason they took so long to be answered was due to (as explained by Saint Brides Media) a combination of lots of different people, in different countries, holiday season and a newly appointed CFO. Enjoy the read over a coffee this morning. Agriterra – Shareholder Q & A Dear Directors, Please find below, a list of questions created by a number of long term shareholders in AGTA, we would be very grateful if you could take a look at these questions, and where possible, provide answers to these questions. We appreciate that in some cases you may be restricted as to what you can say. Please note that the answers to these questions will be circulated on the ADVFN bb. 1) Are the directors considering using media, such as video interviews, to more regularly engage with both current shareholders and potential shareholders, plus to create more regular company presentations to keep investors appraised on developments? It would be nice to have a bit more visibility and communication from the directors. a. The board are very cognisant of the importance of engaging with shareholders, however with the main operational team being permanently based in Mozambique and Sierra Leone, it can prove difficult to achieve this. Several of the management from both Mozambique and Sierra Leone are planning a trip to the UK before the end of the year and we will definitely try to organise presentations and video interviews to maximise their exposure. 2) Is the company considering off take agreements for the cocoa with major international clients and can they forward sell the cocoa to generate revenue? a. This is definitely an area of interest for the Group and the Board are actively discussing various options in this regard. 3) Has the company considered working with the World Bank (IFC) or other African investors to expand its geographical reach? a. The management have been discussing the possibility of working with the World Bank (IFC) and African investors in order to expand the Company's operations and will announce any material developments in this regard if/when they happen. 4) Is the company strategy still on target to expand into other countries and potentially other food commodities? If so would Nigeria, Tanzania & Ethiopia be among the top destinations for the expansion strategy? a. The Company would be targeting countries with high local demand for agricultural products and favourable climatic, agricultural and political environments for the expansion of its operations. Tanzania, Ethiopia and Nigeria are all very interesting jurisdictions for Agriterra and would be considered for areas of expansion. 5) When can we expect the first beef exports to Saudi Arabia and the Middle East? a. The Company is targeting the export of beef to Saudi Arabia and the Middle East in H1 2014 – further announcements regarding this will be made in due course 6) How many people are currently employed by AGTA? As a significant investor and job creator in the current countries we operate in shouldn't we be promoting this a bit more? Not only do we provide a valuable sustainable business but we also provide a critical logistical solution to remote farmers who may otherwise have no way to sell their products. a. The management in Mozambique and Sierra Leone both work hard to promote their operations in-country, and have built solid relationships with many key decision makers in both local and national governments. 7) Looking at the shareholders list there are no major Agri funds on board, why do you think this is and do you think we may see some funds start to take more of an interest and shareholding in AGTA? http://www.agriterra-ltd.com/shareholderanalysis.aspx a. The Board speak to potential institutional investors regularly and believe that as Agriterra develops and moves towards profitability, this will attract more funds and institutions to invest in the Company. 8) If the share price is so undervalued, as has been reported by directors in recent Proactive interviews I believe, why aren't the directors/management using this as an opportunity to acquire shares in the open market? a. The Board are constrained by various regulatory protocol as to when they can buy shares in the Company. At the moment, as the final audited results are due in the coming weeks, the Company is deemed to be in a close period however I will highlight your point to the Board for future reference. 9) How is the pursuing of the payment of compensation equating to approximately US$17.8mrecompense for the work undertaken and investment made by the Group on the Block Ba oil project in South Sudan, progressing? a. The Board continue to actively pursue the compensation payment however they have not received an amended definitive date for issuance. Further announcements will be made in this regard when appropriate. 10) How is the development of the TFL infrastructure from Freetown to up-country Sierra Leone – 15 acre collateral management facility in Freetown and 2,000m2 site in Kenema, progressing? a. The Kenema warehouse is now nearing completion and should be operational in November 2013. The Freetown facility is still in the early stages of development. 11) Looking at the management structure the directors have a diverse range of business interests, with the growth and development of AGTA how can the directors, specifically Phil Edmonds and Andrew Groves find the time to fully manager AGTA? Is this not a concern for shareholders in terms of focus on the business which must be a challenging full time occupation as it is, without taking into account the growth path ahead and any further expansion which may occur in other geographic areas? a. Phil Edmonds and Andrew Groves have appointed highly experienced management teams in both Mozambique and Sierra Leone to lead the day-to-day operations, in addition to being supported by board members such as Euan Kay and senior management including TFL MD Adrian Simpson, to ensure the different divisions are running smoothly and expanding in line with expectations. 12) Why do you think the share price is currently sitting at 2.2p (as at Fri 9th August)? What catalysts are there in the short, medium and long term which may move the share price? What as shareholders do we have to look forward to for the remainder of the year? a. There are numerous value catalysts to look forward to with Agriterra. In the short term, the retail business in Mozambique looks set to expand rapidly, which will drive increased revenues and higher margins for the Group. In the medium term, as the cocoa plantation begins production, this will significantly enhance revenues and margins and offer further expansion opportunities both in product range and geographic reach. Longer term, the beef division will reach the crucial critical mass required to slaughter animals at full capacity and thus generate much higher revenues for the Group. 13) In 2014 there will be elections in Moz, many commentators see further political instability between now and the elections, the recent instability resulted in RIO temporarily shutting down its mines in Moz and knocking share prices for all Moz focused companies (such as BHR and AGTA) do the directors have any views on the run up to the 2014 elections and the potential impact on the company? a. Whilst it is very difficult to judge these situations with any kind of accuracy at this point, the personal view of the management in Mozambique is that there will be little change or interruption to day to day activities. 14) Are the directors disappointed that the market thought so little of the sale of S Omo to Marathon? And what is the CoS of receiving a further consideration from them for this asset? a. The Board took the decision that as an agriculture company, it had a responsibility to dispose of its legacy oil assets in order to generate the maximum value for shareholders through the increased investment in its core operations. It could be seen that some investors believed that the big pay day for Agriterra would come when it resumed activities on its oil assets, however with the huge dilution that would come from participating in the exploration and development of these assets, the Board took the view that it would be prudent to crystallise the value of the assets now and focus on development of its revenue generating assets. All of the results from exploration at South Omo have been encouraging so the Board remains optimistic of receiving further consideration in due course. 15) What is happening with the Conakry port development? a. With the rapid expansion of its beef and cocoa operations, the Board have decided to concentrate on bringing these to fruition in the near term rather than diverting resources to the Conakry port.
11/8/2013
11:23
the count of monte_cristo: To start the ball rolling a few questions on my mind; 1) Is the company considering off take agreements for the cocoa with major international clients and can they forward sell the cocoa to generate revenue? 2) Has the company considered working with the world bank (IFC) or other African investors to expand its geographical reach? 3) Is the company strategy still on target to expand into other countries and potentially other food commodities? If so would Nigeria, Tanzania & Ethiopia be among the top destinations for the expansion strategy? 4) When can we expect the firsy beef exports to Saudi Arabia and the middle East? 5) How many people are currently employed by AGTA? As a significant investor and job creator in the current countries we operate in shouldn't we be promoting this a bit more? Not only do we provide a valuable sustainable business but we also provide a critical logistical solution to remote farmers who may otherwise have no way to sell there products. 6) Looking at the shareholders list there are no major Agri funds on board, why do you think this is and do you think we may see some funds start to take more of an interest and shareholding in AGTA? http://www.agriterra-ltd.com/shareholderanalysis.aspx 7) If the share price is so undervalued, as has been reported by directors in recent Proactive interviews I believe, why aren't the directors/management using this as an opportunity to acquire shares in the open market? Doing so would also send a positive message to shareholders. 8) How is the pursuing of the payment of compensation equating to approximately US$17.8mrecompense for the work undertaken and investment made by the Group on the Block Ba oil project in South Sudan, progressing? 9) How is the development of the TFL infrastructure from Freetown to up-country Sierra Leone – 15 acre collateral management facility in Freetown and 2,000m2 site in Kenema, progressing? 10) Looking at the management structure the directors have a diverse range of business interests, with the growth and development of AGTA how can the directors, specifically Phil Edmonds and Andrew Groves find the time to fully manager AGTA? Is this not a concern for shareholders in terms of focus on the business which must be a challanging full time occupation as it is, without taking into account the growth path ahead and any further expansion which may occur in other geographic areas. 11) Why do you think the share price is currently sitting at 2.2p (as at Fri 9th August). What catylists are there in the short, medium and long term which may move the share price? What as shareholders do we have to look forward to for the remainder of the year? 12) In 2014 there will be elections in Moz, many commentators see further political instability between now and the elections, the recent instability resulted in RIO temporarily shutting down its mines in Moz and knocking share prices for all Moz focused companies (such as BHR and AGTA) do the directors have any views on the run up to the 2014 elections?
10/4/2012
09:08
euclid5: On Monday I told you about a fantastic play on the thrilling emerging market of Sub-Saharan Africa. We looked at how it's making money by helping develop beef, maize and cocoa farming. But this stock is far more than just a punt on Africa's growing agrarian sector. What I'm really excited about are the opportunities it's developing in the oil business. This is what could really drive its share price. Today I want to delve a little deeper into Agriterra's (AGTA:LSE) business. I mentioned on Monday that Agriterra has caught the attention of City financiers recently. And there's more to that than meets the eye, as I'll show you. From world class spin bowler to successful entrepreneur This company is not run by just anybody. If your memory stretches back far enough, you may remember former England cricketer, Phil Edmonds – a great spin bowler during his 70s and 80s heyday. Well, since hanging up his whites Edmonds has become a leading entrepreneur in Africa. He and his business partner Andrew Groves have set up several successful businesses operating on the continent. And these guys seem to know what they're doing. Not only are they growing the agri-business at great guns (as we saw on Monday), but they've also got their eye on the bigger picture. They've seen first-hand the massive export potential from countries such as Guinea, Mozambique, Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso. But they also know that there's only limited infrastructure in place for getting goods shipped out of these countries to market. That's why in February last year, Edmonds and Groves signed a deal with the Guinean authorities to greatly expand the port of Conakry. AGTA won the concession to build a 30 hectare East Zone to the port. This will include grain storage silos, processing plants, logistics depot, a fuel depot and freight hangars. And AGTA gets to run these facilities for 20 years. Basically, they want to bring modern logistics and freight infrastructure to this part of the world. And given how they're growing their business – it looks like they're going to need it... Cornmeal, cattle, cocoa, palm oil, coffee. You name it... On Monday we looked AGTA's farming businesses in Mozambique. Having made a success of that, the directors have moved on to fresh pastures. AGTA recently expanded into Sierra Leone. As well as cocoa production, it's snapped up a palm oil business too. And, as in Mozambique, they don't just run their own holdings, they buy production from existing farmers too. This means they can grow the business quick-smart. Executive director Euan Kay says he's confident that he can finance the port development from existing cash-flow and finance initiatives from interested parties. He has no plans to come back to the market for more money. And that should be great news for shareholders. But I told you there was more to this stock than meets the eye... ________________________________________ ________________________________________ Why an oil bonanza could be on the cards As I said on Monday, this stock isn't without risk. In fact, it has a rather chequered past. Before 2009, the business was quite a different beast. Trading under the name White Nile, it was an oil exploration business based in Africa. Tens of millions of pounds were pumped into buying oil licences and forming alliances in Africa. A quick look at the balance sheet shows they've written off nearly $108m over the years (mostly from the oil business). But I don't see that as a failing of Phil Edmonds and Andrew Groves. Basically AGTA was the victim of African politics and war. The result of which was nothing ever came of the oil business. When the directors saw the opportunities in agriculture, they quickly changed tack. And the great thing is that those horrible losses in the oil game are all ancient history. They aren't hanging over the business now. What's even more exciting is that there could be a couple of very interesting profit-kickers here. That's because AGTA still has some exposure to those old oil exploration licences. Here's why. When AGTA decided to go into agriculture, the directors struck a deal with Canada's Africa Oil. In return for 80% of their exploration rights in Ethiopia (in a place called South Omo), Africa Oil would undertake all the expensive exploration work. The deal means that AGTA retained a 20% stake and had a free ride on the exploration and drilling works. And now the prospects of finding oil have been given a decent fillip. That's because Tullow Oil (a big-wig oiler with extensive experience in Africa) has bought into the deal. Having bought-in their shares from Africa Oil, Tullow now owns 50% of the project. Knowing Tullow's experience in Africa, my bet is that it wouldn't have bought in if there weren't decent prospects here. With oil prices surging and users looking to move away from Middle Eastern hot-spots, AGTA's 20% stake could, in the words of AGTA's chairman "be very lucrative for shareholders". I expect to get news on how the exploration is going later this year. And there could be another nice little left-over from the oil days. White Nile also had exploration licences in Sudan. Yet war (and politics) blew a hole in this side of the business. Now that there's peace, AGTA says it's in negotiations with the Sudanese government and hopes to receive some compensation for its losses. We don't know how much (if anything) will be payable. But then again, anything would be a boon. The point is, it all adds to this very exciting play on Africa's natural resources. What you need to know before you invest Let's not be under any illusions here. This is a penny-share punt that comes with high risk. We've already seen how operating in Africa can cost dearly. And though I sincerely hope management is right when they say they're not coming back to shareholders for more money, you can never be certain. If they do, it could dilute the value of your holding (even if, as last time they got a deal away at a premium to the share price). The fact is, dealing with food commodities and oil can be a risky business. Commodity prices are all over the place these days and can make a company's profits (losses!) volatile. And to top it all off, we know that emerging market (and risky) stocks can take a hammering if the markets start to get a little twitchy. It's the classic risk-on trade that can get hit hard as soon as investors panic. All of that said, I think the potential rewards outweigh the risks on this one. Especially when you consider what could be a very lucrative oil find. We'll just have to sit tight and wait for news on that. Interim trading figures out this morning look pretty positive. Nothing new there as far as I'm concerned. The company is showing a loss of $3.5m over the last six months. That's because it's aggressively writing down recent investments and focusing on growth. AGTA tells us it's got $11.4m in the bank. I've seen a target price of 7.1p from broker Matrix – and that doesn't take into account the possible oil pay-out. So that's a potential double from here if they're right – but who knows? As far as I'm concerned, there are so many variables that putting a target in is a bit difficult. I'm just hoping for a multi-bagger over a five to ten year period. But I would say that you need to take that punt knowing that you could lose it all if it doesn't pay off. Agriterra is one for a small punt as far as I'm concerned. I'd buy some shares, sit on them and see if it works out. If you fancy that kind of high-risk/high-reward, tuck it away and see what grows. If we get that oil bonanza – then so much the better! http://www.moneyweek.com/investment-advice/share-tips/why-this-oil-play-could-be-a-multi-bagger-57729
29/2/2012
19:25
nofool: Here it is:- 29th February, 2012 Why this food and oil play could be a multi-bagger Dear Subscriber, On Monday I told you about a fantastic play on the thrilling emerging market of sub-Saharan Africa. We looked at how it's making money by helping develop beef, maize and cocoa farming. But this stock is far more than just a punt on Africa's growing agrarian sector. What I'm really excited about are the opportunities it's developing in the oil business. This is what could really drive its share price. Today I want to delve a little deeper into Agriterra's (AGTA:LSE) business. I mentioned on Monday that Agriterra has caught the attention of City financiers recently. And there's more to that than meets the eye, as I'll show you. From world class spin bowler to successful entrepreneur This company is not run by just anybody. If your memory stretches back far enough, you may remember former England cricketer, Phil Edmonds – a great spin bowler during his 70s and 80s heyday. Well, since hanging up his whites Edmonds has become a leading entrepreneur in Africa. He and his business partner Andrew Groves have set up several successful businesses operating on the continent. And these guys seem to know what they're doing. Not only are they growing the agri-business at great guns (as we saw on Monday), but they've also got their eye on the bigger picture. They've seen first-hand the massive export potential from countries such as Guinea, Mozambique, Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso. But they also know that there's only limited infrastructure in place for getting goods shipped out of these countries to market. That's why in February last year, Edmonds and Groves signed a deal with the Guinean authorities to greatly expand the port of Conakry. AGTA won the concession to build a 30 hectare East Zone to the port. This will include grain storage silos, processing plants, logistics depot, a fuel depot and freight hangars. And AGTA gets to run these facilities for 20 years. Basically, they want to bring modern logistics and freight infrastructure to this part of the world. And given how they're growing their business – it looks like they're going to need it... Cornmeal, cattle, cocoa, palm oil, coffee. You name it... On Monday we looked AGTA's farming businesses in Mozambique. Having made a success of that, the directors have moved on to fresh pastures. AGTA recently expanded into Sierra Leone. As well as cocoa production, it's snapped up a palm oil business too. And, as in Mozambique, they don't just run their own holdings, they buy production from existing farmers too. This means they can grow the business quick-smart. Executive director Euan Kay says he's confident that he can finance the port development from existing cash-flow and finance initiatives from interested parties. He has no plans to come back to the market for more money. And that should be great news for shareholders. But I told you there was more to this stock than meets the eye... Why an oil bonanza could be on the cards As I said on Monday, this stock isn't without risk. In fact, it has a rather chequered past. Before 2009 the business was quite a different beast. Trading under the name White Nile, it was an oil exploration business based in Africa. Tens of millions of pounds were pumped into buying oil licences and forming alliances in Africa. A quick look at the balance sheet shows they've written off nearly $108m over the years (mostly from the oil business). But I don't see that as a failing of Phil Edmonds and Andrew Groves. Basically AGTA was the victim of African politics and war. The result of which was nothing ever came of the oil business. When the directors saw the opportunities in agriculture, they quickly changed tack. And the great thing is that those horrible losses in the oil game are all ancient history. They aren't hanging over the business now. What's even more exciting is that there could be a couple of very interesting profit-kickers here. That's because AGTA still has some exposure to those old oil exploration licences. Here's why. When AGTA decided to go into agriculture, the directors struck a deal with Canada's Africa Oil. In return for 80% of their exploration rights in Ethiopia (in a place called South Omo), Africa Oil would undertake all the expensive exploration work. The deal means that AGTA retained a 20% stake and had a free ride on the exploration and drilling works. And now the prospects of finding oil have been given a decent fillip. That's because Tullow Oil (a big-wig oiler with extensive experience in Africa) has bought into the deal. Having bought-in their shares from Africa Oil, Tullow now owns 50% of the project. Knowing Tullow's experience in Africa, my bet is that it wouldn't have bought in if there weren't decent prospects here. With oil prices surging and users looking to move away from Middle Eastern hot-spots, AGTA's 20% stake could, in the words of AGTA's chairman "be very lucrative for shareholders". I expect to get news on how the exploration is going later this year. And there could be another nice little left-over from the oil days. White Nile also had exploration licences in Sudan. Yet war (and politics) blew a hole in this side of the business. Now that there's peace, AGTA says it's in negotiations with the Sudanese government and hopes to receive some compensation for its losses. We don't know how much (if anything) will be payable. But then again, anything would be a boon. The point is, it all adds to this very exciting play on Africa's natural resources. What you need to know before you invest Let's not be under any illusions here. This is a penny-share punt that comes with high risk. We've already seen how operating in Africa can cost dearly. And though I sincerely hope management is right when they say they're not coming back to shareholders for more money, you can never be certain. If they do, it could dilute the value of your holding (even if, as last time they got a deal away at a premium to the share price). The fact is, dealing with food commodities and oil can be a risky business. Commodity prices are all over the place these days and can make a company's profits (losses!) volatile. And to top it all off, we know that emerging market (and risky) stocks can take a hammering if the markets start to get a little twitchy. It's the classic risk-on trade that can get hit hard as soon as investors panic. All of that said, I think the potential rewards outweigh the risks on this one. Especially when you consider what could be a very lucrative oil find. We'll just have to sit tight and wait for news on that. Interim trading figures out this morning look pretty positive. Nothing new there as far as I'm concerned. The company is showing a loss of $3.5m over the last six months. That's because it's aggressively writing down recent investments and focusing on growth. AGTA tells us it's got $11.4m in the bank. I've seen one target price for 7.1p from broker Matrix – and that doesn't take into account the possible oil pay-out. So that's a potential double from here if they're right – but who knows? As far as I'm concerned, there are so many variables that putting a target in is a bit difficult. I'm just hoping for a multi-bagger over a five to ten year period. But I would say that you need to take that punt knowing that you could lose it all if it doesn't pay off. The numbers you need are below. And if this kind of speculation is too nerve-racking for your money, that's OK. I know it's not for everyone. If you're more interested in a value approach – picking up great assets trading at extreme discounts to the value of the business – keep reading. I know someone who can help... Ticker: AGTA:LSE Mid-Price: 3.4p Bid/Offer Spread: 3.35p/3.4p 52 Week High/Low: 3.85p/1.975p Market Cap: £36m Five year performance: 2007 -66.74% | 2008 -93.3% | 2009 +182.14% | 2010 -52% | 2011 +1.56% | 2012 (to 28 February) +26.39% Agriterra is one for a small punt as far as I'm concerned. I'd buy some shares, sit on them and see if it works out. If you fancy that kind of high-risk/high-reward, tuck it away and see what grows. If we get that oil bonanza – then so much the better!
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